Re: Happy Independence Day

A thought...
If the British had won, would we be modeling Hornby today?
Here's wishing all our neighbours to the south a pleasant Independence Day.
> Enjoy your long weekend.
>
> Ian Mathers
> Yellowknife, NT
> Canada
>
>
Reply to
Rob
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Thank you, Ian Mathers. I trust you had a good July 1.
Reply to
Corelane
Here's wishing all our neighbours to the south a pleasant Independence Day. Enjoy your long weekend. ------------------------------------------------- Thanks, Ian. Hope you had a happy Dominion Day.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad:
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Reply to
Bill
On Fri, 4 Jul 2003 17:18:26 -0700, I read these words from "Jon Miller" :
That's something I noticed during my US (driving) vacations. The fireworks outlets were almost all on State lines. Presumably they're legal in some States and not others ?
-- Ian S
Reply to
ian-stewart
snipped-for-privacy@blueyonder.co.uk wrote in message ...
That is correct. For example, fireworks are legal in New Hampshire, but not in Massachusetts. And believe me, the fire chiefs and fire marshals all want New Hampshire to ban them. Too many fires, too many accidents, & too many deaths, so they say. Personally, I can see both sides. I like fireworks, but I don't want my house burned down because my idiot neighbor can't aim (hey, the guy already tried to burn down the place with a charcoal grill; imagine what he could do with explosives!).
Paul A. Cutler III ************** Weather Or No Go New Haven **************
Reply to
Pac Man
Yep, the same way alcohol and tobacco taxes are higher in some states than others. Ohio hates to lose liquor business to Indiana, but it doesn't take a PhD to figure out why it happens.
Within one mile of the Indiana/Ohio border at the south end of the state there are dozens of liquor and fireworks stores on the Indiana side. Around the holidays, Ohio agents like to take down license plate numbers and bust people as they cross the border. They could bust from dawn till dusk, but they prefer to get the biggies, like the Ohio bar owners who cross to Indiana to stock their entire place up.
These state wars are always interesting... back in the late 1980s Indiana was one state that refused to raise the speed limit for trucks as many other surrounding states had already done. Truckers proceeded to boycott all of the Indiana truck stops and would top off before heading cross the state. This really put the hurt on the Indiana businesses, which had nothing to do with the speed limit legislation, but apparently via indirect osmosis, it worked, and the speed limit was eventually raised.
And to counter some of these things, some states (naturally those with exhorbitant fuel taxes) passed laws requiring truckers to buy fuel if they pass through the state. If you get stopped at an exit border and don't have a receipt, you can pay a fine. This is the kind of thing that got a boatload of tea scuttled a couple hundred years ago...
Andy
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- Pre-Interstate Urban Archaeology -----------------------------------------------------------
Reply to
Andy Harman
Illinois only allows sparklers, snakes, and maybe smoke bombs. Firecrackers of any kind and size are outlawed.
Wisconsin sells the stuff, but you need a fireworks license, which used to be very easy to get from what I heard. I think they've toughened that up somewhat now. Don't really know. Never bought any; hearsay only.
Tennessee: Almost no limits. A friend used to bring back a bunch every time he went down there.
Jay Modeling the North Shore & North Western C&NW/CNS&M in 1940-1955 Due to spam, all e-mails except those from selected addresses will be refused. Thanks for your understanding.
Reply to
JCunington
Legal or not, after my next-door neighbor put a toilet in his front yard as a flower planter, I was seriously starting to consider purchasing an M-80 or bigger. Fortunately the porcelain got removed after 2 days.
A drive-by shooting was starting to look like a good option, also. No! The toilet, not the neighbor!
Jay Modeling the North Shore & North Western C&NW/CNS&M in 1940-1955 Due to spam, all e-mails except those from selected addresses will be refused. Thanks for your understanding.
Reply to
JCunington
Duh, take a different road back, or come over on a road that doesn't have liquor stores on it. Or would that not work with the mechanics of the search methods?
Jay Modeling the North Shore & North Western C&NW/CNS&M in 1940-1955 Due to spam, all e-mails except those from selected addresses will be refused. Thanks for your understanding.
Reply to
JCunington
One state somewhere back east used to have agents in the shopping centers next to the borders. They would track all the license numbers of cars from their state and do raids for merchandise brought across the state lines. I believe this had to do with sales tax. What I heard happen was they caught "too big of fish" (congressman or something like that) and the "S" hit the fan!
Reply to
Jon Miller
Depends... if they are after a biggie, they might just follow him right out from the liquor store to the state line. And they don't have to catch them right at the border, just in Ohio with a bunch of Indiana-stamped bottles. In the more rural areas, probably no big deal but I-275, I-74, and U.S. 50 are the main roads across the border in the SW Ohio/SE Indiana area, and those are the ones they work first.
Andy -----------------------------------------------------------
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Reply to
Andy Harman
A dollar's worth of your best diesel, attendant.
Eric
Andy Harman wrote:
"And to counter some of these things, some states (naturally those with exhorbitant fuel taxes) passed laws requiring truckers to buy fuel if they pass through the state. If you get stopped at an exit border and don't have a receipt, you can pay a fine. This is the kind of thing that got a boatload of tea scuttled a couple hundred years ago..."
Reply to
Eric
I believe you're referring to New York, both the state AND the city.
Because New Jersey has a 6% sales tax rate, New Yorkers come over here to buy certain items, not only because of the tax rate difference (NYC has an 8.25% rate), but also because certain items like clothing is not taxed at all.
The City's revenue agents would go to various shopping malls here in northern New Jersey and record the license tags of New York cars, and then send the owners notices saying "Pay the difference."
As for the practice ending, I'm not 100% positive it happened as you state.
Dieter Zakas
Reply to
Hzakas
Pa used to do that with liquor. The state has a monopoly on all liquor sales and would watch the stores in NJ for people with Pa plates buying booze. Then stop them when they came over the border. Don't know if they still do it.
Reply to
trainnut
Sounds like a violation of Constitutional prohibitions on taxation on interstate transport of goods. Sue the bastards in federal court.
Reply to
Rick Jones

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