Realistic Train layouts ?



?
There's a Rulebook?
~Pete
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On 18/12/2010 12:58 PM, Twibil wrote:

There's a Rulebook for Everything. Unfortunately, it was lost the last time the Universe moved into new accommodations.
Wolf K.
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wrote:

Yes there is. It is the one you write for your railroad.
--
Frank Rosenbaum
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wrote:

Which means that there is no rulebook.
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Which means that there is no rulebook.
--------------------------------
It depends.
For my GER there was an acquisition rule book.
As I was going for a particular "look" that meant only purchasing "stuff" that would be 1958 or earlier. Nothing newer than 1958.
Locomotives had to be those types typically seen or be possible to see in southern Quebec in 1958. I say "possible" as I have three Spectrum 2-10-0 (That have since been de-Russianed) that barely qualify as being "typical". Justification for these is they were used on a light rail, light bridges branch line serving an un-modelled paper mill. Then there are the three RS-1s, a model that was never sold new in Canada. I went with the non m.u.ed RS-1 as in the GER history, copying what the CPR did in real life, the GER dieselized it's main line across northern Maine as a diesel experiment but used FA-1s and RS-1s rather than the diesel power used by the CPR. The RS-1s were used as yard and way freight power and the A+A FA-1s were used on freights and were only m.u.ed between the two A units. The use of the RS-1 and FA-1 is still logical as that part of the GER's main line is, of course, in the U.S.A. so "American" diesel models are appropriate. Of course, the FA-1s and RS-1s have since migrated into the general locomotive pool but the RS-1s still do not have m.u. while the FA-1s have now been so equipped.
For example, because of my "rules" you'll not see any 2-8-4s as none ran in Canada nor will you see any articulated steam. The largest GER steam power is a small fleet, in two classes, of smallish 2-10-2s which may become small 2-10-4s as I'm not happy with the large space under the all weather cabs. Rolling stock is strictly what was typically seen in 1958. Yes, in the photos of the GER there are one or two anomalies, CPR script lettering on one or two boxcars for example but they were subsequently removed and either given away or repainted. Ditto for road vehicles and even the lettering font used on buildings. You'll find no Helvetica font on the GER as that wasn't in common usage and may not have even been invented, in 1958.
All GER cabooses, three classes, have copulas as side vision "vans" were not typically used in Canada.
If you are trying to model a realistic model railroad, freelanced or prototypical you must have personal purchasing rules otherwise you end up with something that is completely un-realistic. Running steam with double stacks just doesn't cut it in the realism department and using the old saw "It's my model railroad" still doesn't make it "right", if you are aiming for realism rather than just a collection of unrelated model trains.
However, if you are not aiming for realism, then buy and run what you like and knock your socks off while doing it. :-)
--
Merry Christmas
Roger Traviss
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On 19/12/2010 4:49 PM, Roger Traviss wrote: [...]

[...]
From Wiki's site:
"Helvetica was developed in 1957 by Max Miedinger with Eduard Hoffmann at the Haas'sche Schriftgiesserei (Haas type foundry) of Mnchenstein, Switzerland. Haas set out to design a new sans-serif typeface that could compete with the successful Akzidenz-Grotesk in the Swiss market. Originally called Neue Haas Grotesk, its design was based on Schelter-Grotesk and Haas Normal Grotesk. The aim of the new design was to create a neutral typeface that had great clarity, no intrinsic meaning in its form, and could be used on a wide variety of signage.[1]
When Linotype adopted Neue Haas Grotesk (which was never planned to be a full range of mechanical and hot-metal typefaces) its design was reworked. After the success of Univers, Arthur Ritzel of Stempel redesigned Neue Haas Grotesk into a larger family.[2]
In 1960, the typeface's name was changed by Haas' German parent company Stempel to Helvetica (derived from Confoederatio Helvetica, the Latin name for Switzerland) in order to make it more marketable internationally. It was initially suggested that the type be called 'Helvetia' which is the original Latin name for Switzerland. This was ignored by Eduard Hoffmann as he decided it wouldn't be appropriate to name a type after a country. He then decided on 'Helvetica' as this meant 'Swiss' as opposed to 'Switzerland'."
Helevtica became popular in the 60s.
HTH Wolf K.
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[...]

[...]
From Wiki's site:
"Helvetica was developed in 1957 by Max Miedinger with Eduard Hoffmann at the Haas'sche Schriftgiesserei (Haas type foundry) of Mnchenstein, Switzerland.
[Big Snip]
Helevtica became popular in the 60s.
---------------------------------------
Which is, in effect, what I wrote. :-)
It has become THE most popular type face.
Merry Christmas Roger Traviss
Photos of the late GER: - http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
For more photos not in the above album and kitbashes etc..:- http://s94.photobucket.com/albums/l99/rogertra/Great_Eastern/
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On 12/19/2010 6:54 PM Roger Traviss spake thus:

Your point is a good one; I've seen too many otherwise realistic layouts, buildings or dioramas that were absolutely ruined by using an inappropriate typeface, like Helvetica (or its predecessors) in a pre-1960s scene. It's a seemingly small detail, but actually a crucial one.
I think some modelers, lacking typographic resources, end up making signs on a computer printer using "default" fonts (like Arial, which is very close to Helvetica). Thing is, it's actually not difficult at all to obtain better fonts, even for free.
--
Comment on quaint Usenet customs, from Usenet:

To me, the *plonk...* reminds me of the old man at the public hearing
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On 19/12/2010 10:18 PM, David Nebenzahl wrote:

http://www.1001freefonts.com /
And many, many other sites.
Wolf K.
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On 19/12/2010 9:54 PM, Roger Traviss wrote:

Just thought I'd show your surmise was correct. ;-)

Merry Christmas to you, too.
Wolf K.
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"Wolf K"

Just thought I'd show your surmise was correct. ;-)
---------------------------------------------
OK Wolf, cheers. :-)
--
Merry Christmas
Roger Traviss
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On 12/17/2010 4:38 PM, Musicman59 wrote:

One of the things that we model railroaders suffer from is the lack of sufficient space to recreate reality at an exact proportionate reduction in what ever scale we work in. As such, a method of getting more into a given space known as "selective compression" is often used. By this method we get a sufficient representation of the real world reduced to fit our available space, and hopefully we get the "feel" of the actual scene on our layout. Sometimes out attempts are successful, sometimes not so much, as in the layout that you observed above. If you keep looking you'll find some layouts that will WOW you.
--

Rick Jones
Remove the Extra Dot to e-mail me
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 22:28:44 -0600, Rick Jones

One of the best O-scale layouts I have seen was the Keighley society's "Runswick Bay". Pre-grouping North Eastern Railway, in a 13' diameter circle.It was based on a secondary line with small engines and short trains.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2YKemTv_pU

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*snip*

*snip*
I've seen the opposite extreme with a lot of weathering. Some things are weathered so much it's just not realistic. It rains on my layout; does it rain on anyone else's?

There's usually quite a bit of stuff in the way, no matter whether it's cities (buildings and cars) or country (trees, corn, topology, houses). Done well, the layout looks better and feels bigger. Done poorly, it looks bad.

Bachmann makes a 4-4-0 American type locomotive. I believe the 1800s stuff is out there, but you just have to look for it.

Puckdropper
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For the 1800s, look up Paul Scoles - http://www.paulscoles.com/Photo_Album.php
Assuming WWII to be part of the steam to diesel transition, check out Tony Koester -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Koester
For realistic in general see the Free online magazine Model Railroad Hobbyist and The work of Joe Fugate
http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com /
While George Sellios and more particularly John Allen did much to advance the Hobby, both built caricatures . Sellios built initially as a showcase for his products and had to revamp what he had to make it useable as an "operating" model railroad. Tony Koester helped him with that. John Allen had "operations" in mind from the beginning.
--
If your name is No, I voted for you - more than once ...


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Craig, check out www.tmrci.org click on 'pics vids' and scroll to HO Layout. I am now a member of the club and of all the clubs I have joined, this seems to be the most 'complete'. Check the pics of the Trenton Northern. This is a trolley line that runs through downtown Summit.
There would be more rolling stock and locomotives for WWII than the 1800's.
--
Frank Rosenbaum
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 14:38:40 -0800 (PST), Musicman59

Layouts are like anything else, everyone does them differently. I've seen plenty of stripped down layouts...which look VERY realistic, but on the other hand I've seen just what you describe above.
All too often layouts have way too much track and not enough scenery. This is understandable in sections of the layout that feature yards, but some people try to cram as much track as possible in every nook and cranny.
One of the biggest problems I often see is many layouts have multitrack mainlines throughout the entire railroad. Most real railroads have some areas which are single track. Also especially on smaller layours switches seem to be every foot or two, and again this is understandable from an operational standpoint, as the builder is trying to put in as many industries as possible to justify the trains that run the layout.
Larger layouts have the luxury of space for long runs where there aren't tons of industry tracks branching off in all directions...but again, sometimes when a builder has such space, he fills it up.
I personally don't currently have any space to build, so it's not an issue with me at the moment. But when I do get into a home with enough room to build, I plan to exercise some restraint in cramming everything possible into every scene. Some of the finest scenes I've seen on layouts have nothing more than a single track running through, and some rolling hills and trees, maybe one building or other structure and a few figures.
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In photographs the number one give away that you're looking at a model is figures. Followed closely by track.
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OTH the more detail you have the more interesting it is to the visitors. It is also mre fun to build
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 14:38:40 -0800 (PST), Musicman59

Model railroading covers more than just building static models and dioramas. For some model railroaders, operation (or electronics, or collecting) are the part(s) of the hobby they enjoy most, and the scenery is but an afterthought, something put there just to cover the bare plywood. Heck, I've operated with some people who are happy with bare plywood with unfinished plastic models for most of their layout - operating is what they enjoy and their scenery will probably never go further than that.
It's a broad hobby - more than just diorama building.
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