Road Markings

Hi all
Just laid a road using Woodlands Scenics stuff.. so far so good!
Any one have an idea as to make white lines in the middle of the road?
Thanks Rob
Reply to
Rob
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a) make a stencil b) use striping tape
In any case, use an offwhite of light dirty grey. Road markings don't stay white very long. :-)
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
What is striping tape? Thanks
Reply to
Rob
Go to a good auto parts store and ask to see some
CH>
Reply to
Captain Handbrake
If you're using modern US conventions, you'll want to use yellow, not white, for the centerline. -- Bill McC.
Reply to
Bill McCutcheon
Pinstriping tape for model cars. You'll find it at any hobby shop.
Also, as someone else mentioned, lane markings will be YELLOW if between lanes where traffic moves in opposite directions, white if both lanes go the same way.
Don
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Reply to
Trainman
The stuff car freaks use to put stripes on their cars. Comes in many colours and widths. Made of thin vinyl and sticks like the dickens. Automotive supply stores and some hardware stores carry it.
Also, artists use striping tapes. Artist and drafting supplies stores carry it, but I've never used it.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Right, the change occurred in the early 60s, took several years, but was complete (even for counrty side roads) by about 1970.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Thanks Wolf, ill check it out this am.. Rob
Reply to
Rob
Gel Pens, made for writing on dark paper. I use the sheets of craft foam for roads (black and gray) and have had excellent results with these. You can get them in all kinds of colors - white, yellow, black (for correcting mistakes or putting in cracks and/or seams) and blue (for handicap markings). Get tham at art supply places.
Reply to
Joe Ellis
BTW, I don't use tape for several reasons:
1) Inevitably, tape comes up. 2) It's a pain to get to go around corners or make dashed lines or stop bars 3) Using the gel pen all my makings look alike, like they're painted on the pavement: stop bars, street and parking lot lines, handicap parking marking, no-parking zones, all have a realistic look. Use the etched-brass RR Xing stencils for crossings. It's easy.
Reply to
Joe Ellis
Graphics tape I wouldn't recommend (Chartpak is the most common brand). It is too thick and the adhesive is weak. It's designed for graphic work that will be photographed then thrown away. Also, most of it is glossy, and the yellow isn't orange enough for road markings. It's useful for adding certain kinds of details to structures, especially the metallic tapes, but not much good for roads.
Mark Alan Miller
Reply to
Mark Alan Miller
And how about some road kill. Didn't someone make cat and dog road kill splaters? Bruce
Reply to
Bruce Favinger
... and more fanciful victims like lawyers. See:
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-- Bill McC.
Reply to
Bill McCutcheon
I read somewhere a neat idea. Havn't tried it yet but it should work well. Paint the yellow down the center of the road, over spray is ok. Then with that graphic arts tape that doesn't stick real well....make the strips over the top of the yellow paint. Then spray paint the road the color you want it to be, add cracks and pot holes if desired, then pull up the tape and weather the whole road. Oil drips, etc....
Peter
Reply to
Peter J. Gross
Cool, Joe, I'll try that. Never thought of it. And my grand daughter went through a gotta-have-them-gel-pens phase, too. :-)
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
There is an article about that very subject in April's edition of the MR magazine. Starts on page 36.
Reply to
Jeff Hensley
"> > b) use striping tape "> What is striping tape?
Real narrow colored tape. Used to be commonly available at drafting and art supply stores, but with CAD being the way things are going, it is becoming hard too get.
"> Thanks "> "> ">
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Reply to
Robert Heller
Robert Heller wrote in news:93a56$4241e2b8$cb248f0$ snipped-for-privacy@nf1.news-service.com:
Having previously used it in actual drafting applications, I thought this would be the way to go when I did my first layout for the kids about 16 years ago. It even came in solid and dashed lines, but it did not stick very well. At that time, my "road" was just the plywood tabletop painted with FloQuil "Concrete" color, and sidewalks were 1/16 x 3/4 balsa strips also painted with the FloQuil. The tape started to peel up after just a few weeks.
Reply to
Norman Morgan
How about using chalk sticks, sharpened to a chisel point? Road markings don't stay in pristine condition very long, and chalk would give that 'run over' look. Fix by a matt spray. And don't forget to camber your model road. Regards, Bill.
Reply to
William Pearce

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