Engine Painting

Sounds to me like another "cheap products give problems" situation. The article mentioned below seems to imply that the greatest problem is in
commerciall large scale assembly where high-speed assembly methods are being used. Not really applicable to rebuilding a stationary engine!
--
Peter Chadbund
The Douglas Stationary Engine Resource
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Ditto on gas turbine engines - as far as I know MOD specs do not preclude the use of SS. I've never had any problems using them when restoring cars and general machinery over the past twenty years or more.
--
Peter Chadbund
The Douglas Stationary Engine Resource
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Hello
Thank you to all those who responded to my original post (below). I appreciate your comments.
The consensus seems to be: Prime, undercoat and top coat individual parts and then reassemble, painting nuts as appropriate.
However, if none original washers and nuts are to be avoided, as Roland suggests - are there any hints and tips for avoiding damage to the top coat at assembly when tightening nuts etc?
Regards
Ade

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My advise is just to purchase a nice little artist's paint brush and touch them back up afterwards, that's what I do when I'm reassembling my junk!
Julian.
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If the nuts are sound then I lightly chamfer the inside corners. Not strictly correct but avoids the paint damage. I do the same when making new ones.
hth Roland
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Shouldn't that read 'outside corners'? Washers work here as long as they don't rotate. Assembling while the paint is new (dry but not hard and brittle) also helps especially if washers are used. Be carefull when painting any mating areas or where fasteners seat. The paint will stop metal to metal contact. The inevitable vibration will result in movement that rapidly destroys the paint and the fastener ends up loose. It's also possible to build up a cumulative error with paint. I built an engine and painted evrything, including mating surfaces. Every joint was therefore held slightly apart despite tightening the bolts. The engine ended up measurably larger to the point where it wouldn't fit into the subframe.
John
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Bob,
What I don't understand is why go to the expense of SS nuts and then paint them anyway.
Martin P

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wrote:

I dont paint them they are left clean , if I was going to paint them i would just use plain steel nuts.
like here
http://www.bobsengines.co.uk/Petter%20S%208%20hp/IMG_2743.jpg
rgds bob
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Easily avoided. Hold the component in place and go round its outline with a craft knife. Scrape to that line before final assembly.
ttfn Roland

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