Fowler Pump

We have now acquired an original Fowler 1PA water pump set. A nice unit
which had been restored and rallied about 7 or 8 years ago but has lain
dormant for about 5 years. The pump has had new seals and I now want to put
it back into running order. I am a little concerned about running the pump
without treating the pump leathers etc as I am sure they will have dried out
over time.
I was thinking the leather cups would benefit from a soak in neatsfoot oil
prior to putting it back to work ? Does anyone known of a source of
neatsfoot oil and any other suggestions for preserving the pump ?
The only details on the pump is the word 'No.1' cast on various parts and a
small brass plate with what appears to be the pump number. Having little
knowledge of pumps is anyone able to identify it ?
Photos at the usual place
formatting link

Regards
David
Reply to
David McC
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I have found that if you put fairy liquid in the water when you first us it works well, as long as you can put up with the mass production of bubbles.
Martin P
David McC wrote:
Reply to
Campingstoveman
Saddlery places should have neatsfoot oil.
Tom
Reply to
Tom
As I know a bit about the tanning of leather, I'm not so sure Neatsfoot oil is the best thing to use in this context - although I'd obviously stand to be corrected. My thinking goes along the lines that the tanning process goes to great lengths to remove the naturally occurring fats which, when they rot, assist in breaking down the collagen fibres of which the leather is made. Replacing them with a something like Neatsfoot Oil - itself made from animal products - may only serve to return the leather (a kind of fossil after tanning) to its natural state and accelerate decomposition..
For myself, I would be more inclined to treat leather seals, diaphragms & gaskets with an inert wax, applied warm onto warm, dry leather, which should be so treated until the wax lies upon the surface indicating saturation. Wipe off the excess & refit.
A further small point is that an inert wax will last better in intermittent use and (if used in the real world) would not contaminate drinking water.
Usual disclaimers!
regards,
Kim Siddorn.
Post hoc, ergo propter hoc!
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
The pump, as you probably know, was made by Thomas and Sons of Worcester, the owner of the firm being known locally as 'Pumpy Thomas' The cottages erected for the workers apparently still survive. The No1 is the smallest size, and I have seen a No.5, which was a humungous lump of cast iron......I 'm not sure if there was No.6. My own No.3 appears on Martin's photos that he took at Lamport.
I had new leather cups for mine when I restored it, about 12 years ago. They came with a sort of waxy finish, but were extremly hard and rigid, with no hope of getting them in the bore of the pump. I soaked them in Neatsfopot oil for a few days, and they became far more pliable, It was then possible to fit them in the bore, but it still wasn't easy. I wrote an article about the restoration for SE, but I doubt if the back number is still available.
Since then, I've never had to disturb the innards, and its still pumping away merrily, so I don't imagine the neatsfoot oil can have done any harm.
I remain to be convinced that making it into a bubble making machine is quite the way to go :-)
Regards
Philip T-E
Reply to
philipte
mild lubrication only, not bubble maker :-))
Martin P
philipte wrote:
Reply to
Campingstoveman
Thanks for the replies, very interesting! I now have an idea of what I am going to do with the leather seals and Philip has identified the pump for me!
It always amazes me how willingly and quickly queries are answered on this NG, thanks again!
David
Reply to
David McC

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