Motorway swap meet

Some of the Usual Suspects took a little trip out this morning to one of
Nuncle Peter's Motorway Swapmeets.
Roland Craven, Peter Forbes, Paul Evans and myself descended upon Magor
services off the M4 in Wales to exchange Useful Spares. Three trailers were
unloaded and reloaded, gifts given and hostages exchanged (ooops, sorry,
been writing scripts for days!). We were in the lorry park, so attracted
minor attention from the rightful denizens of that realm - there I go
again - but it was an interesting couple of hours. Even fixed up a mini bus
of Scotsmen on their way somewhere when their silencer fell down. I think it
was mean to give them plastic rope so it would melt ten miles down the
road - well done Paul!
I took a few pictures as is my wont and you can see them at
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Regards,
Kim Siddorn,
Reply to
J K Siddorn
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Thanks for those Kim, its always interesting to see junk changing hands. Do you think its really appropriate to list the album under Scenery and Nature? Some green types might find the images disturbing :-).
Love that cap, Roland, quite the country gent! ;-).
Arthur G
Reply to
Arthur Griffin & Jeni Stanton
The Semi Tangye diesel, as you naughtily called it, is all apart. Its basically OK. The usual new little end bush, mains, and of course the missing fuel pump. ttfn Roland
Reply to
Roland and Celia Craven
Was it low compression ratio that caused semi diesels to need the preheat from cold?
AJH
Reply to
Andrew Heggie
Interesting pics as usual Kim, should have got someone to take one of you though..........
Reply to
Pete Aldous
Generally semis were built with lower CR so needed extra heat as the compression alone would not generate enough. Once running the thermally isolated hot bulb provided a source for the extra heat and starting heat was provided by a blowlamp or some sort of firework. AFAIK the reason for semi-diesels was to avoid the massively heavy construction then felt to be necessary for a full diesel. ttfn Roland
"Andrew Heggie" wrote in message > Was it low compression ratio that caused semi diesels to need the
Reply to
Roland and Celia Craven
---- and all under the eagle eye of one of the biggest cop shops in Wales. Amazing you didn't get the "Hello,hello,hello what do we have 'ere" treatment. "Wot do u mean -- you're swapping a load of rusty tat"-- they would have tried to impute some much more sinister motive!
Colin
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Reply to
Colin Osborne
I guess semi diesels fall into the surface ignition catagory. Do they inject fuel at the end of the compression stroke as per full diesels or during the induction stroke as per some hot bulb types where the deliberately uncooled area performs the dual role of vapouriser and ignition source?
Reply to
Nick Highfield
Again my understanding, there are many more knowledgeable than I. AFAIK the terms semi-diesel and surface ignition are generally taken as interchangeable although I've known it to be the subject of heated, but unresolved, debate. The Petter S, designed to run on something akin to diesel, sprays about 15-20 deg BTDC but the Tangye bumf says its starts spraying about 10 ABDC. I presume there is a difference in spray pressure for whilst the S uses a precision spray pump, Tangye and Ogle used gland packing on the pump rod. The Ogle appears to be similar to the Tangye but pre-dates it by about 15 years. My interpretation of the T and O bumf is that they were designed for something much closer to Paraffin. There would seem to be two systems in use; The S is said to be based on the very successful Bolinder but what are the other two based on?? I set fire to the exhaust pot over two hours ago and its now just a pot full of glowing embers. Happily the weather meant neighbours had windows closed and no washing out :-) regards Roland
Reply to
Roland and Celia Craven
Nope, too obvious.
Some years ago we were lost in Germany in the mini bus on a Sunday and it came to me that we needed to get off the Autobahn, turn round and go back the way we'd come. A Mercedes 306D, it had a really appalling lock and needed a big swing to get it round. Leading a convoy of six vehicles, I spotted a yard below us just at a junction on a small industrial estate. We swing into the yard, it's too small to get the Merc round in one, the other members of the convoy think we are pulling off for a urine break and follow me in.
I urge it too and fro, entirely taken up with what I'm doing, there is dusty mayhem all around me as the cars all try to turn round at once, getting in mine and everyone else's way. Out I go, back on the road, leaving behind me - I was assured by a chorus of voices - a dust covered number of shaken looking men and women who were transferring boxes from a van to an Irish-registered estate car.
I wonder .......................
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
"Colin Osborne" <
Reply to
J K Siddorn
"Roland and Celia Craven" wrote
The big Tangye here uses packed pump rods and sprays at 1900 psi, the Worthington Simpson is set at 2000 psi and is again packed. I'm sure someone will tell me I'm wrong but I always assumed that the Bosch/CAV style "precision" pump elements were simply more reliable in service as the packing did not need regular checking/replacment.
Asbestos clad Paul
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Reply to
Paul Evans
Thanks Roland, this confirms my guess.
AJH
Reply to
Andrew Heggie
Might I be right in remembering that modern pumps spray at 3,000 psi?
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
J K Siddorn
Neat winch on that trailer - is it a commercial item or home made??
In message , J K Siddorn writes
Reply to
John Ambler
"John Ambler" wrote
1000 Engine Rally, 2002, £40 complete with wire, 8 ton pull.
We have an 8 ton hydraulic drum winch on the front of the LandRover as well :-)
Paul
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Reply to
Paul Evans
In comparision the latest common rail diesels are using upwards of 20,000psi injection pressures now!!!
Tim..
Reply to
Tim (Remove NOSPAM.

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