A few more numpty questions

Morning all,
A few more numpty questions if I may.
Working in 00.
I'm starting to plan a drive through (rather than dead end) fiddle yard,
and I've got ~12ft by ~2ft, with a curved entrance at each end. So far,
so good.
First question. I inherited a load of Peco track and assorted points.
How do I tell what it is (code 100 or code 75) ? Looking at the
templates on Peco's site, some of it matches code 100 other bits code
75.
Second question. What is the difference between a single and a double
slip ? The aforementioned Peco diagrams both look the same (and the
Peco slips I've got match neither the code 75 nor 100 templates).
Third question, what is the best way of getting the sidings into the
yard ? The angle on a point appears to be about 11 degrees, which by my
reckoning gives me four loops, one of which will have hardly any length
at all.
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
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The difference between a single and double slip, is that a single only has one curved section linking either the two right or left hand turn outs (I cant think of a better way to describe it, at present), whereas a double slip has curved sections on both sides.
So effectively, a double slip has two options from each of the four input tracks.
Reply to
sutartsorric
The code is the rail height in thousandths of an inch, so Code 100 is 0.1" (2.54mm) high and Code 75 is 75thou (1.9mm) high. I think Peco track is available in both with the same geometries, but you'll have compatibility problems trying to connect one to the other because of the height difference. Maybe Peco do conversion fishplates - I don't know.
A double slip allows you to travel from any track to either of the opposite tracks. A single slip doesn't! The Peco templates should be different, I would hope.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
In message , Adrian writes
Hi Adrian
First - Look at the underside of the sleeper mouldings. If the word Finescale appears as well as the Peco Streamline branding then it is code 75.
Second - Single slips have one curved route so you have to decide which way round to use it. Double slips have two curved routes so can be used either way round as it is symmetrical.
Third - Turnout angles on most Peco OO gauge turnouts are 12 degrees - approximately 1 in 5. In your situation setting out the turnouts in your available space will be the best way to see how long your loops will be. Bear in mind that a simple ladder formation - one turnout leading to only one other for each loop will take most length. In your situation you would be best to use a compound ladder where the first turnout leads to two further turnouts - one on each exit route from the first turnout. If you want an illustration of this let me know and I will email you directly.
Regards
Reply to
Bill Campbell
You can build the yard like this, and all the loops should be the same length
----------------------------------------------- \ \ \--------------------------------------\ \ \ \--------------------------------------\ \ \ ------------------------------------------------
The minimum spacing for the tracks using Streamline points will be 2 inches.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
In message , Adrian writes
Many thanks for the prompt answers, much appreciated (is every one else hiding indoors away from the cold ?).
From a random sample, it looks like I'm on code 100, so that answers that bit.
The explanation on slips is what I thought it would be (but wanted to be clear), I know now which I've got (doubles).
Bill, I think I understand your suggestion, I had been thinking of starting at the back, and having a ladder coming across, I could start in the middle with a 3 way, that may work (clearance at one end could be an issue). More time on the drawing board !.
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
You can also save space as I did by using curved turnouts on the approaches. When I built my 8x6 foot layout, I used mainly old PECO Setrack first radius curved points ST242 and 243. I managed to get 5 fiddle tracks between 4 and 6 feet long, plus a loco runaround track also giving access to the turntable, in a total length of just over 7 feet including the curves at each end. My 6-coupled locos and my passenger and freight stock will negotiate these with only occasional derailments. Here's a photo of one end of my fiddle yard; four 1st radius and one 2nd radius curved points can be seen. The 2 outer tracks are the main running lines.
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On the other side of the layout I've used 2nd radius curved points to create a 3-track section through the station with provision for crossing between running lines, and for access to the fiddle yard.
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The layout is powered through two twin DC controllers using only the insulfrog points to isolate sections. The points are powered by Gaugemaster point motors using a Gaugemaster CDU with 16VAC input.
ST242 and 243 points are still available on the internet - they are packaged in a distinctive blue, red and white bag. See for example:
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or
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Reply to
MartinS
MartinS wrote in news:X0xIo.39235$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe21.iad:
I did the same - or at least very similar - the only drawback are 8 coupled locos .. they can get a bit stuck.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
52mm spacing! I know there's only 1.2mm in it but if you space your tracks at 2" and then try to put a crossover between them you will have to wiggle the track ends out.
It is possible to trim the curved rails (evenly) if your prototype had closer spacings.
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
There are often situations where a train would never run from one track to another across a slip point - main line into an industrial siding for example. Double slip points were/are expensive to maintain (prototype) so the single slip is preferable.
On my layout I have the following situation:
Goods shed. ]---------\ \ Industrial siding. -------------\-------[ Platform \ Main line. ---------------\-------------------------
Nothing ever goes from the industrial siding to the goods shed so that slip road is superfluous, but there were no singl slips on the market when I built it.
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Narrowing the track spacing shortens the curve (or vice versa, depending on how you look at it ;-) Shorter curves gives less chance of long wheelbase locos locking up.
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Greg Procter wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@ihug.co.nz:
Handy tip that thanks, I'll bare it in mind as I'm rebuilding (again!) at the moment.
Reply to
Chris Wilson

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