Motorising model signals - any good on-line tutorials about?

Hi Folks,
As title, even though I haven't been able to update my website for a while
with up to date pics my little layout is moving on quite nicely and I'm now
at the stage where I'm thinking about the signalling. *Well I have thought
about it before but kept putting it off).
I picked up a very good book on how to actually make model signals and found
some good on-line resources to that end but what I haven't found is anything
really good with regards to actually motorising them.
What particularly concerns me is the length of throw of the motor compared
to the throw required to actuate the signal and how the throw can be
transferred from the motor to the signal arm - particularly with regards to
signals on gantries and brackets. I'm sure I'm making a fuss about nothing
and that what I want to do is reasonably simple however I do have a habit of
"re-inventing the wheel" and I'd rather do this particular job right first
time.
If it isn't obvious I'm talking about semaphore signals and interlocking
their operation with that of the various pointwork so I do want to use
"electrics" rather than some form of rod/cable arrangement. 4mm scale.
Any pointers gratefully received.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
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I've seen done very well with "memory wire" Try running a search for this and signals
Reply to
Les Pickstock
You can find memory wire through the links page at
Alternatives are relays, point motors, the units made by Brassmasters , and model aircraft servos.
Keith
Make friends in the hobby. Visit Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
Reply to
Keith Norgrove
Les, Keith,
Thanks.
Chris
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Chris,
I have powered my Ratio semaphore signals using relays because standard point motors are far too violent. See:
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for an example. These particular relays are Omron 24V and contain a DPDT switch as well. I run them on 24V DC from the Merg RPC system. You can use the switches to provide your interlocking, although I did it with computer software:
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as this was far easier than doing it with wiring.
Graham Plowman
Reply to
gppsoftware
One of my main concerns.
Looks nice, what do you use for a linkage?
Cheers,
Chris
Reply to
Chris Wilson
That's got to be the easiest to follow explanation of how to use memory wire I've seen, page bookmarked, thanks for the pointer.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
I use straight steel wire for the linkages on some although brass wire tends to be easier to work with.
Graham Plowman
Reply to
gppsoftware

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