Ratio OO signal kits - Any good?

Sorry chaps - OO signals, something I have almost no experience of.
I have some Hornby signals from my own childhood, but some have the
actuating wires missing and the paint jobs are a bit passed their best.
I need to make up several signals, a bracket home and 5 single post homes
for a start, and I want them to work (plan would be wire in tube, details to
be worked out once I get a working example to play with).
I have made a lot of use of the Ratio signal kits, but not as signals (the
LNER kits are handy source of girders for sci-fi stuff, and factory debris
for OO scale wargame sets)
A) Are they any good? The chap I am putting them together for isn't that
bothered about accuracy, but I am trying to keep it all as correct as I can.
B) Easy to get to work? Do they have a good design for the arm, likely to
be free and easy to add an actuator to?
C) Is the Ratio fishing line signal control any good? My instinct is to use
wire in tube.
I'm building these for a rather poorly chap, so I'm buying them for him and
my own current circumstances mean cost is an issue.
Any thoughts/comments welcome.
Regards
Mike
Reply to
Mike Smith
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In message , Mike Smith writes
Hi Mike
We have used these very successfully on exhibition layouts - a little care is needed in assembly and it is essential to use the balance weight lever as part of the operating mechanism to ensure that the fragile connection to the signal arm is not subjected to the stress from the operating mechanism. Peco track pins are ideal as shafts for the signal arm and the balance weight.
We used the Ratio remote kit as it provided an easy method of fixing and operating. The line control works fine - we used Fulgurex point motors for remote operation. The supplied levers are, of course, a much more economic option.
These kits lend themselves to modification for the situation. There is a limit of two operating arms per remote control unit as the base can only accommodate two cranks and return springs.
Regards
Reply to
Bill Campbell
Sounds same as my 1 attempt. Got it built and working but is fiddly - need 3 hands - and instructions not brilliant.
often find them 2nd hand - unbuilt - and can be cheap via ebay, depends on who else wants one at the time.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Thanks chaps, I'll start off with the station starter signals, if I can get them working I'll buy kits for the rest.
Regards
Mike
Reply to
Mike Smith
On a related note, what's the best way of painting the signal arms? Paint tends to run along the lateral grooves and it's quite hard to get a straight edge.
Also, do people usually drill out the spectacles and fill with translucent? Guy
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
Guy, I paint the whole arm in the base colour, then use a small strip of waterslide transfer to make the stripe. Modelmaster sell red, white and black stripes/patches.
I glaze the spectacles with Kristal Klear then colour them with a permanent felt marker.
Reply to
John Nuttall
Thanks for that. Oh my, drilling those out without killing the plastic part is going to be amusing. Guy
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
Guy, I should have mentioned that I replace the arms with etched ones by Scalelink. Model signal Engineering also do etched arms.
Reply to
John Nuttall
Ah, that makes perfect sense. I have to say that the lattice posts look pretty fragile, but hopefully that won't be put to the test. Guy
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
Hi
I think the signals are excellent if you are dextrous enough to make them and you don't break them once installed on your layout - they are quite fragile. I made the LNER signals and found them too difficult for me - I broke the bell cranks and requested some spares from Ratio who declined. I made them by bi-passing the cranks.
The levers are sweet and the string system works quite nicely over short lengths.
Philip
PS You might like to view my railway on Youtube: 'Saltspring Garden Railway'
Reply to
Philip

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