tree making

I was up at my dad's over the last few days. He's a bit poorly but took the
time to show me around his new layout and in particular the trees he's just
been making. Anyway his technique is new to me and the results looked
superb so I thought I'd share it ... apologies if it's old hat.
In essence he uses the stalks from bunches of grapes to form the trunk and
branches of the tree. Dries them first to make them hard then chops of the
little knobbly bits on the end of the stalk and lo and behold there you go,
all ready for flok or covering of your choice.
They looked really good, could see the very fine grain in the stalk I'm
going to have a bash with them myself over the next few weeks, for anyone
who hasn't tried using them, give it a go.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
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Strange you should mention this Chris ......... we were at Butterley on Thursday and we were talking to a couple about our sons layout. He said he was in the process of building a 'N' layout and was listing all the things he was using like pan cleaners for hedges and grape stalks for trees. He said they worked a treat.
Chris
Reply to
Dragon Heart
A problem with grape stalks is that a few years later they will be very brittle. Whether that's a problem or not is how long you think your layout will last. My layouts seem to remain for a decade or more.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
The message from Greg Procter contains these words:
No time for all this short-termism... I started my current layout in 1985. I'm still working on it, and I hope to live long enough to finish it...
Reply to
David Jackson
Greg Procter wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@ihug.co.nz:
Cheers, I'll try a few "dry" then try a couple left in vasaline. Don't half look good though.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Make a solution of glycerine, alcohol, and water (approx 1:2:5). Soak the plant material in it. That will prevent it from drying out for several years.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Try soaking them in glycerine. That's what the suppliers do for the lichen and other plant-based material you buy at the model shop.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
That brings to mind a recipie I read in a Railroad Modeller from somewhere in the early 1960s. I can't remember all the ingredients, but the concept was to absorb the vaseline into methylated spirits/medical spirits plus something else and then soak the trunks in it to preserve them and their flexibility.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter

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