Whats a ..

"Nos. 60 drill" in modern units - preferably mm - an approximation will do.
Cheers, Simon

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1.0414mm
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you might find this handy
http://www.csgnetwork.com/drillsizeconvert.html
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Thanks now certain which part goes in hole :-)
Cheers, Simon
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Er no, if we're going to be exact it's only 1.0414mm if modelling to P4 standards, if working to EM standards it's 1.034mm but if like Simon you're working on 00 gauge it's 1.026mm with a tolerance of +/- 0.0094mm whereas of course the tolerance for EM is +/- 0.0008 and for P4 0.0002.
... give or take :-)
--

All the best,

Chris

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That explains the shape of many a kit I build :-)
Cheers, Simon
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All very amusing but unfortunately the original answer is wrong! My venerable copy of Osborn's Cutting Tool Guide shows No 59 as 1.041 mm. No 60 is 1.016 mm or 0.0400 inches.
If you can't get a No 60 drill I would use a 1.0 mm drill and wiggle it about a bit :-)
--

Regards

John



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Its ok thanks, as explained in another reply just needed to confirm identy of metal piece - anyway these locos werent built at Horwich :-)
Simple method of confirming drill bit, drill holes in plastic using range of bits, insert part into holes till identify minimum bit size.
Cheers, Simon
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I had the other problem here in Canada. I wanted to replace some broken metric drills bought in England, and had to figure out the number equivalents.
--
Martin S.

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I remember when metrication came in many years ago, going to a large ironmonger in Glasgow to get some small drills. I wanted number drills, but I had made note of equivalent metric sizes just in case. I asked for my size in number drill and the assistant replied that they did not sell number drills because of metrication. I then asked him for the equivalent metric drills, and he said that they didn't stock them. I then asked him the smallest drill they supplied and he said "1/64th" ;-)
Jim.
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Jim, Guthrie wrote:

Just after we went metric I wanted some 5/8" diameter aluminium tube. The hardware shop would only sell it to me as metric diameter (19mm) even though it was exactly the same stock as pre-metric. "What length do you want?" "I'll take a 2 metre length." "Sorry, we only sell it in 6' lengths."
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wrote:

That happened with timber as well. I wanted a 6 foot pice of 3"x2". The guy assured me that they only used metric measure now and I would require 1.8metres. So I painfully calculated the other two measurements in metric and he said, "Oh you mean 3" x 2" Sir". Shows how long ago it was too, he called me Sir.
--
Tinkerer



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Chris Wilson wrote:

In reality it can't be more accurate than 1.04. The nearest commonly available metric drill bit would be 1.05mm. Drilling by any method likely to be available* to Simon would produce an ap[proximately 1.1mm diameter hole. Use a 1mm drill bit in a pin chuck, run it through several times and you will have a 1.1mm hole. (*Pin chuck, B&D in a drill stand, Dremel etc)
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Or use a 1mm bit once and force fit :-)
--

All the best,

Chris

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You can still buy "number drills".
Does it need to be a tight fit or loose?
MBQ
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wrote:

You can still buy "number drills".
Does it need to be a tight fit or loose?
MBQ
=====================Its for the slide bars to fit cylinder fronts - got to drill slots. The long bits of metal with square profile included are about a mm thick so parts dimensions match instructions for these to be slide bars. But crossheads have 2 outside bits and a spacer piece, recon this will be too narrow for 1mm slide bar. Got chance to assemble crosshead and check/modify slide bar before things fitted and arkward - another trap avoided :-)
CHeers, Simon
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wrote:

yes but IME they seem to vary wildly in size compared to when Dormer used to molish them in Sheffield.
And the prices: http://www.toolbank.com/p/DORSET6180 is 77 beer tokens!
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