Zero 1 controller

Can a Zero 1 controller puchased in the UK be converted to operated in
the USA I was thinking if the transformer is change out to handle the
110 voltage in the USA or just using on110 volts then it may work. I
know it is no longer made or supported but I think it may be worth a try.
Any suggestions?
SC
Reply to
user
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"user" wrote
I can't think *why* you'd want to do this. Surely it's better to look at an up-to-date DCC command centre rather than trying to use 20+ year old, obsolete technology.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
I think that there is also an issue regarding the different frequencies i.e. UK 50 cps, USA 60 cps (hertz?)
I believe that the decoders for European and North American markets were different because of this.
I don't think that the experiment would be worth the effort given that DCC is now so economical and the results are so much better than Zero 1.
Dave W.
Reply to
David Westerman
There is another issue in that transformers which are rated for 50Hz can overheat when operated at 60Hz.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
You can purchase a 120 to 240 volt converter in the US. Providing the equipment is not frequency dependent, it should work. Steve
Reply to
titans
Phil: NO - Not without major internal changes! As someone else mentioned, one of the problems with Zero-1 was that it was tied to LOCAL MAINS FREQUENCY - ie 50Hz here and 60Hz over there (And therefore a definate non-starter in Japan where they have both! (not in the same place though).
So it is not simply the input voltage that would need changing (which could be achieved by a suitably rated external step-up transformer 110
You would heave to ensure that it ran correctly at the revised data rate of 60Hz cycle based info - - Zero-1 chips relied on the polarity reverse in the waveform to turn off the tiacs/thryristers used in the loco module (and this was one of the early problems when back-emf or similar problems stopped it dropping, and it continued into the next half cycle, and provided smoke.) This also contibuted to the limit in how many locos could run, because, at whatever speed they were set to, locos running in the same direction, would ALL be taking power in the latter part of the power cycle .. reaching the current limit easily.
Bernard Lenz, in designing what became dcc, avoided these problems by using the data(rate) to switch the track polarity (no separate data and power sections of the signal) and with each decoder module full-wave rectifying the track voltage, they are then internally working on their own 'dc', which is then controlled internally (usually by variable pulse width) to generate the required speed and direction - each decoder can be operating at its own frequency/phase, and so, in theory, many different locos, each running slowly, could all be taking their power at different times, and therefore allowing a larger numner to run within the 'current limit'.
The Zero-1 repetition rate also resulted in flickering of colour light signals which is distracting/annoying.
Reply to
Phil
I actually had an US 110v version of this a few years ago, got it from E Bay, don't remember were it came from , maybe Canada. The only good thing about it was that it hooked me on DCC, in my case Digitrax, which is widely available here in the US, and works with no problem with all my Hornby, Bachman etc stock. Like the other posters said, why???? Rob
Reply to
Rob
I actually had an US 110v version of this a few years ago, got it from E Bay, don't remember were it came from , maybe Canada. The only good thing about it was that it hooked me on DCC, in my case Digitrax, which is widely available here in the US, and works with no problem with all my Hornby, Bachman etc stock. Like the other posters said, why???? Rob
Reply to
Rob
There were changes made to the design/circuit _after_ Zero 1 was put on the US market so I guess the change from 50 to 60 cycles per second made some difference.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
It's the other way round. 60Hz transformers and motors may well overheat when used on 50Hz - the lower the frequency the more iron (and copper) you need.
I remember when they started televison in Jamaica 42 years ago the better quality imported US sets, such as Zenith, actually had heat sinks fitted to the mains transformer to try to combat overheating of the 60Hz transformers on 50Hz.
kim wrote:
snip
Reply to
Dick Ganderton
Stuart, send me your E Mail address off group, so I can reply to you Rob
Reply to
Rob

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