230v question

I'm fairly new to welding aside from what I've done with my low voltage AC stick welder. of course it didn't take long before I felt the need to get
something more powerful. many of the welders I've been looking at have 230v input. I'm familiar with what it takes to create a 220v receptacle as I've done so for a dryer. how do you wire a receptacle for 230v? what is the difference (and don't say 10 volts of potential)?
thanks, Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Larry, It's "nominal 230V". Depending on utility, your voltage could range from 110V to 120V per hot leg. That gives you 220V - 240V when they are combined into a welding receptacle. Your welder won't care.
If you have 208V, then you may have to make a change in your machine.
Don't sweat the 10V. Go to an electrical supply and get a NEMA6-50 receptacle and wire it just like an old dryer circuit (2 hots + ground).
I'm getting by now with an extension cord that plugs into my dryer outlet and has a NEMA6-50 box on the other end of 30' of 10/2 cord. This works fine for my 175 amp MIG box.
Have fun.
Jeff Dantzler
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Silverberg wrote:

Convention/terminology. Used to be 110/220 then raised to 115/230. Don't recall just when but I believe the North American standard is now 120/240.
Ted
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We just recently wired a couple servers and discovered the outlets read 248V here in Sedro Woolley Washington. The folks at Puget Power insist anything from 250 on down to 220 is "good juice". It surprised me that the voltage was that high, and that it was "normal".
Larry

with
how
say 10

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
220#0$0 volts, its all the same. Historically, the original circuits were 110volts nominal (double that for both sides of the line) The power companies figured out they could get more power (and $$$) through the same wires if they ran the voltage up. Currently, I get about 122 volts as my normal power which goes to 244 volts on double pole. It can go as high as 127 volts in my area.
If you have wired a dryer outlet, the welder is the same drill. You need to worry about wire size, new double pole breaker, proper ground setup, and the plug type. If you are starting from scratch, plan on doing a 50 amp circuit. You can run many of the 240 volt welders off a 30 amp dryer circuit but you will be limited on the top end welding currents. But the 30 amp circuit will let you run 1/8" rod very nicely.
Larry Silverberg wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.