DIY machine jack

Hi,
I have a lathe and a milling machine in my home shop. I want to install levelling feet under the machines, so I need to lift the machines at
each corner. The machines are rather heavy. The lathe is 3700 pounds and the mill is 4200 pounds. I have looked for machine jacks that would be able to lift these, but they are around 600$ here in Turkey. I don't want to spend this much for a tool that I will maybe use just one time, so I decided to build something that I can use to lift the machines, one corner at a time.
I want build a hook from 3cm x 3cm mild steel rod and then I want to push this hook up using a regular hydraulic car jack. So the hook will look something like: I will also use suitably thick I beam to make a 4 legged frame that has a rail where the hook can go up and down and a spot where the car jack will be placed.
Machine The edge hook | ==== | || ^ | || _| || | ===My biggest concern is how to weld these pieces together. I have a 250A 3 phase stick welder. What kind and thickness of rod must I use for the 3cm x 3cm rod and for the I-beams (1cm thickness maybe). Any recommendation for making a solid weld to carry the above load much appreciated...
Timur
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Timur Aydin wrote:

Can you get a hydraulic engine hoist / crane there at a reasonable price? They run about $200 US. Lifting the machine ends from a higher point will help with stability, and those hoists are good for other shop uses like lifting heavy rotary tables onto the mill.
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Pete C. wrote:

Thanks for the response. I have seen economical engine hoists, but they are rated for around 800 Kg. That might strain the hoist, especially when lifting the lathe at the headstock end, no?
Timur
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Timur Aydin wrote:

The hoists I'm familiar with here have about four boom extension settings with capacities that range from 1,000# (~450kg) at the longest extension to 4,000# (!1,800kg) at the shortest extension. The hoists are powered by 8T long extension hydraulic jacks.
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The one's I've seen for $200 are manual and more like 1000# at the shortest setting...but maybe I've been looking in the wrong place.
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Actually, I guess they were rated for 1500# or so, I just remember thinking I wouldn't trust them with over 1000#.
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Remember (you probably already have) that you won't be lifting the entire weight of the machine, although in the case of the lathe, the headstock end will be substantial.
Not having seen your machines I can't really speak authoritatively but I have never had problems with moving normal size shop machinery by hand. A long (2 M +) lever usually allows you to raise the machine a centimeter, which allows you to put a block under it, then the other side, and back and forth until you get the machine as high as you need it to be.
Cheers,
John B. (johnbslocomatgmaildotcom)
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John wrote:

Hi John,
Here are the pictures of the machines:
http://www.taydin.org/web/lathe http://www.taydin.org/web/mill
-- Timur
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Timur Aydin wrote:

BTW, the lathe already has some feet installed, but these were installed incorrectly, so they will be removed first and will be installed correctly.
--
Timur

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When I was a millwright we used rol-a-lifts to move lathes and mills. With a Johnson bar You tip the machine up enough to insert the forks, do likewise on the other side, strap the two together and jack them up. You now have your machine on wheels in case you want to relocate it. you may not want to buy two of these but at least you can get some ideas from the pictures if you're building some devices.
Engineman
http://www.rolalift.com /

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wrote:

Excellent equipment.
I dont see very many of these in California..most folks simply hire riggers and have them move Stuff with fork lifts..but I can Definately see the utility value of these devices.
Gunner

"Aren't cats Libertarian? They just want to be left alone. I think our dog is a Democrat, as he is always looking for a handout" Unknown Usnet Poster
Heh, heh, I'm pretty sure my dog is a liberal - he has no balls. Keyton
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That did the trick! Nice machines, by the way. so clean! I'm jealous.
what did you use to weld it up? what kind of heat? -mark
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mkzero wrote:

Nowadays, all I do is clean and oil the machines. I can't wait to finish installing the feet to the milling machine and start producing some chips :)

Hi, I used 3.2mm 6013 rod with a current setting of 110 Amps. I used my grinder to create a 4 mm bevel at the edges of the pieces. During welding, I used a zig zag motion.
--
Timur

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Timur, 3700 lbs is not that heavy, you should be able to find or make a big pry bar to do what you want. You can also look up "johnson bar" in google.
i
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Ignoramus543 wrote:

Hi, I already have a large pry bar, but I really can't push it down to lift one edge of the milling machine. Maybe I can hang a load to the end of the pry bar to give me an advantage...
Timur
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Timur Aydin wrote:

(...)
Sounds like a "Toe Jack". http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200056924_200056924
Include 'feet' on both sides of the lifting surface so that the jack doesn't tip forward.
--Winston
--

On YouTube, all the tools have volume controls.

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There we go, that's what I was trying to describe. --Glenn Lyford
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Glenn Lyford wrote:

I used it's little brother, the Model# TRJ7102: http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200349250_200349250
... to lift a bunch of >250 lb concrete slabs into the air, serially. The jack was very patient and held the load up stable and safe.
Disposed of 20 yards of concrete that way. Twas easy, even for a weak old man.
--Winston
--

On YouTube, all the tools have volume controls.

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Winston wrote:

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200349250_200349250
That one is perfect for my machines. The price is also very nice. But unfortunately if I ordered this, it would most certainly end up in customs and that will be the end of it.
But looking at its construction, it really looks simple to do. If I weld the pieces using a 1cm thick mild steel plate on the sides and a 2cm thick plate for the toe and the top section, do you think it would safely lift my machine? Do I need to do heat treatment after the welding? (I hope not, never done it before).
I am also looking into larger capacity engine hoists. That would help me a lot when changing the lathe chuck and lifting the rotary table to the mill.
Timur
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Timur Aydin wrote:

That's an engineering question which I cannot answer.
The steel for the 'shelf' on the TRJ7102 is about 5.84 mm thick and it is not heat treated. The base, welded to the bottom of the hydaulic jack, is about 14.35 mm thick. The toe is about 12 mm thick and is tapered. It isn't heat treated either. The shelf assembly is fixed to to the top of the hydraulic cylinder with one socket head cap screw.
Welded to the side of the bottle is a length of 48 mm wide male 'U' - channel which engages a slot in the shelf. A shoe on the bottom of the shelf bears on the face of the 'U' channel to translate side force through to the base. So the piston sees relatively little bending force. Nifty!
I applied a little grease to the shoe, where it contacts the channel.
In lifting larger slabs out of the ground, I've pushed the jack into 'safety limit' bypass a few times (> 4000 lb load). I see no bending or other damage to any part of the jack, outside of the expected scratches and dings.

Home Shop Machinist Magazine (IIRC) had a short article about using a small crane for that. http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_74569_74569 It mounted to the far right corner of the lathe table and swung out of the way when not in use. Very cool.
--Winston
--

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