Fast, Inexpensive, Strong Drawers



I suspect he's not familiar with box joints or the normal shift & cut methods used by off-the-shelf (or typical home-made) box joint jigs.

Indeed.
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writes:

Can you post a description of it?
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https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/box-joint-basics
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On Sat, 12 Oct 2019 14:50:08 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

First off, the objective is to make box joints. To be clear on the definition, this is a box joint:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box_joint
Here's a nice howto on making a jig for a handheld router:
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsgy6d4365k

He doesn't show it with the pieces stacked, but the principle is fairly straightforward. Same technique but clamp together all the pieces that get the same cut and do them at once.
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On 10/12/2019 4:00 PM, J. Clarke wrote: > On Sat, 12 Oct 2019 14:50:08 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
>
>> writes: >>>> On Sat, 12 Oct 2019 06:42:47 -0400, "Jim Wilkins" >>> .. >>> I suspect he's not familiar with box joints or the normal shift & >>> cut >>> methods used by off-the-shelf (or typical home-made) box joint jigs. >> >> Can you post a description of it? > > First off, the objective is to make box joints. To be clear on the > definition, this is a box joint: > > <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box_joint > > Here's a nice howto on making a jig for a handheld router: > > <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsgy6d4365k
> > He doesn't show it with the pieces stacked, but the principle is > fairly straightforward. Same technique but clamp together all the > pieces that get the same cut and do them at once. >
The objective is to make drawers strong enough, fast, and cost effective. In that order of importance.
Board lumber (other than general rough construction lumber) is expensive locally so it could be self eliminating over ply. There are no "real" lumber yards left around here. Just construction lumber yards who, "can get that for you, but it will be expensive." The last guy with tons of good stuff actually was across the street from my old office. About the same time I went over to see him about some stuff for a big job he retired and liquidated everything. He didn't have anything I needed left. Just my luck. LOL.
Not sure who made the comment about gluing end grain on plywood, but um... only half of the end is end grain.
One thing I noticed is a lot of the guys (on YouTube anyway) doing pocket joinery don't seem to be using glue. When I have glued and screwed ply in the past (not pocket joinery) I used lots of glue. The combination is pretty darn strong and doesn't seem to shift, tweak or flex much. Ply is also pretty stable.
By the way I do know what a box joint is, and I got the message about stacking the first time. Jim is more of a metal worker than a wood worker like myself. You are more likely to see him hanging around R.C.M than R.W
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On 10/10/2019 12:13 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

I've no experience with making drawers for holding hundreds of lbs. of motors and such, but, I absolutely would not simply use Titebond and pocket screws with plywood. Pocket screws are not appropriate, imo, for any drawer and gluing plywood edge grain to face grain is also a no no in my book, especially if strength is an issue.
Personally, I wouldn't even use plywood, I'd use 1x material with at a bare minimum of locking rabbited drawer joints and glue. No screws needed but could clamp with nail gun for speed while glue dries. This would be very fast for multiple drawers of a standard size on just your table saw, and way stronger than pocket screws, glue and plywood.
Also it's worth noting that drawers do not need to be the full height of the drawer opening. The drawers mainly just need to keep the items from rolling off the drawer. You can save a lot of material with 100 drawers that way. Use plywood for the bottoms.
--
Jack
Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.
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