Globs

(snip)


No worries. I wasn't sure which you had meant in your original comment, and given that one of my hobbies is extreme computer overclocking, it was a chance to pull out the heat conductivity charts.
For the overclocking, most of the time copper is good enough for being able to transfer enough heat away from the CPU, the problem is what to do with the heat from there.
Liquid nitrogen is pretty good if you are just benchmarking, and copper pots to hold it above the CPU is about ideal. There are some people who have gone to the expense of making their pots out of silver, but they are the exceptions.
Anyway, hope you are doing well and got caught up on your sleep.
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wrote:

Thanks! Doing well enough. Im trying to decide if I want to go out to the lake and play with my new toy or wait till tommorow when the fruit loops are off the lake.
https://picasaweb.google.com/104042282269066802602/FJ1
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Got you on that one gunner - copper absorbs or transmits heat / electricity much easier than that of Aluminum. The real good thing is it will not weld with normal welding sticks. Al is so soft - melting temp is low and will fail. It also decays away from heat when melted and pops.
There is likely a time and place for each. Al is so much cheaper. Al can be poured into shapes to fit assemblies.
Copper work hardens and gets brittle and breaks - like most Al.
Martin
On 8/24/2013 8:27 AM, Gunner Asch wrote:

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On 21/08/13 13:25, Terry Coombs wrote:

If you can't see the puddle clearly then that's a problem. I find with both MIG and TIG the puddle and weld area are far harder to see clearly with an auto darkening helmet than a plain fixed shade filter even when the auto dark helmet is set at a lower shade. Maybe put the auto helmet, if that's what you're using, aside and try a fixed shade and see if you notice a difference.
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David Billington wrote:

The problem wasn't not being able to see the puddle , the problem was recognizing it . I'm past that problem now , and am beginning to get a handle on the glob situation . I just have to back the filler rod out of the heat envelope .
--
Snag
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wrote:

Greetings Snag, You've guessed it right. Keeping the rod out of the heat is important. You want to use the rod to help control the heat. So you get the puddle formed and then introduce the filler. Make a quick stab into the puddle and then back out. You will find that once you get the hang of it your beads will look like the "stack of dimes" that folks strive for. Keeping the rod cool really helps control the heat of the puddle. Letting the puddle melt the rod instead of the arc really goes a long way toward controlling the puddle. Also, with aluminum especially, the cooler rod will form an oxide layer much slower. As you know, aluminum will form an oxide layer quickly. This layer, when formed at normal temps in free air, is quite thin and stays thin for a long time. But when the temp is elevated a much thicker oxide layer forms quickly. And the oxide melts at a much higher temp that the rod. It can also form a layer around a molten droplet that can prevent the droplet from fusing properly with the parent metal. And speaking of oxide layers, I read recently that it is better to use a brass brush than a stainless brush to clean the weld area just prior to welding. If I remember correctly this is because the brass will remove the oxide layer easily but will not scratch the aluminum underneath very much because the brass is fairly soft. Stainless brushes will scratch the aluminum comparatively deeply and as these scratches will have much more surface area than just a flat surface so will the oxide layer be that much greater. And of course this extra oxide interferes with welding. Eric
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On Wed, 21 Aug 2013 19:56:20 +0100, David Billington

Good suggestion! And if possible..get one of those nifty gold plated lens. Seems to help a lot for some reason. Someone here suggested it years ago, I tried it and it helps a lot.
For me. Your mileage may vary.
Gunner
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"David Billington"

All I use is an auto helmet. I'll _never_ go back to the fixed shade! My neck is still suffering from that GD flip down piece of s..t. Many years ago a friend needed a shield and asked if he could borrow my flip down one. Sure, it's here somewhere in the junk pile. Found it and told him he can have it. What do you want for it? I want you to promise me that you'll never bring that S.O.B. back, ever! ;>)} Auto helmets were made for TIG and they rule! Mine is a Morsafe made in USA by Jackson. No problems in 15+ yrs.
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On Wed, 21 Aug 2013 19:56:20 +0100, David Billington

Imwas having trouble seeing through my auto darkening helmet. It was a cheap Harbor freight one that I bought to experiment with. So I borrowed my son's helmet, a $250.00 unit, I forget which one. I couldn't see through it very well either. I was curious about this so the next time I was on the mainland I stopped in at Central Welding and at Harbor freight to sample the goods. I could see OK through the expensive hoods at Central, but not as well as through a normal lens. I then sampled the Harbor Freight hoods and found that of the three hoods they were selling I could see very well through the one with the blue flames on the side. All three hoods were made by a different factory in China. Anyway, I am really impressed with the "Blue Flame" helmet. I'm gonna buy another just to have a backup and for visitors to use. Eric
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