heres a tough one, trying to remove a countersunk bolt

I have an el-cheapo air hammer that the adjustment knob bolt broke off
of. wouldnt be an issue except the it needs to be adjusted.
the bolt was and allen head type, and was countersunk, the botl shaft
is about 3/8 in a 1/2 hole. impossible to get a vice grips or likewise
in there to get it out. same with trying to dremel a slot in it to turn
it with a screwdriver.
I thgouth about trying to weld a 1/4 bolt to it. I should have barely
enough room to get the 1/4 in, and a small arc weld rod. just want ti
stuck enough to get the bolt out to replace it.
anyone have a better suggestion? I am all ears
Reply to
Tater
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Harbor Freight sells a set of left hand drill bits for removing broken bolts. I've got a set, but haven't had to use them yet.
Seems like they might be just the ticket. There are about five different bits in the set, and they go for like $3.00 when they are on sale.
Don W.
Tater wrote:
Reply to
Don W
OK, el cheapo air hammers cost what, $6 these days? My first thought is chuck it and buy a new one.
My suggestion is to make a piece of sheet metal and hammer it to a little cone shape with a hole at the apex of the cone large enough for the bolt fragment to stick through, and drop this cone, apex down, over the bolt fragment inside the recess. Then weld the bolt to the sheet metal, then take a nut and weld it to the sheet metal and turn the nut. This trick is what the old truck guys do, and it's what everyone should try BEFORE you go get the Vise-Grips and break off the end of the bolt fragment.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
spend more money!?! Surely you jest :)
I figgured that this would be a cure or kill solution, as you are right, air hammers are the 2nd cheapest air tool attachment available. I only have it because of that reason and to test out my air compressor.
neat trick, i'll be trying it. thanks
Reply to
Tater
For a small bolt like this I would suggest that the reverse drills would be a good first thing to try.
A similar technique to the sheet metal cone that I have had some success with is to take a piece of pipe that will fit inside the hole and to grind the end to be a good fit to the contour of the broken bolt. You can then use a small stick electrode to reach down inside the pipe and weld the pipe to the broken bolt. You will not be able to see much and need to make the weld by sound, it helps to turn up the heat to avoid sticking. Don't burn through the side of the pipe. You should try a few practice welds inside a similar pipe. This technique is definitely easier on larger sizes but I has worked for me on some very deep problems.
Good luck, YMMV
Reply to
Private
That is a good trick. I'll have to try to remember it for those hard to reach bolts.
Don W.
Reply to
Don W
When this works properly it is great, but use CAUTION, a failure can make the problem a LOT worse, (don't ask, but I do own one very expensive carbide drill bit!).
Reply to
Private
I second that. up here they call 'em "bolt-out" or something of the sort. 2 ended little hexagonal buggers w/ a drill at one end to create a hole in the top of the sheared bolt and the other end has a left-hand tapered helix out of HSS or tungsten carbide. dirt cheap and handy for the tool chest.
by far the quickest/simplest solution(if you can acquire the tool)
-mk
D> Harbor Freight sells a set of left hand drill bits
Reply to
mkzero
As other people have said EZEEOUTS which are the reverse taps, drill a hole into the broken bolt then as you use the reverse tap it (should) draw the bolt out. They **usually** work very well. The other method I use is to centre punch the remains of the bolt at one side and try to hammer the remains out by hammering anto clockwise, if that makes any sense
HTH Jim
Reply to
Jim

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