How to remove protective cover on Lexan?

Well, here I am once more wearing down my fingernails
while trying to remove that protective covering that they
put on sheets of Lexan.
Yes. I know. It's supposed to just peel right off. But never
seems to work for me. Half comes off. Half stays on.
And then HOW do you get the remainder off?
My usual solution for things like labels is to use Varsol.
Tougher labels come off nicely with Goof-Off. But this
product attacks most plastics and you are left with a real
ugly mess.
So my current solution, if you can call it that, is to soak the
part in soap and water for a while. Then go at it with my
fingers.
Anything better?
Thanks,
DOC
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Reply to
DOC
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If you happen to have a pressure washer that works really well. Naphtha or paint thinner are fine. Sometimes it just won't come off and you have to buy a new piece. A little heat from a hair dryer works sometimes. Not a heat gun.
Reply to
dann mann
WD40 had been reported to work well for this.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Davey
I was told never to leave it in sunlight or that will happen. Sorry for no help , but it is pretty durable stuff.
Reply to
Sunworshiper
By accident a brake fluid container leaked all over some really old, stuck-forever paper covered sheeting I had stored in a corner. When I went to clean up the mess, I was surprised to find that the paper slid right off the plexigalss sheets.
YMMV. I would test on scrap. I don't know how long ago the container had leaked The brake fluid did not affect the finish on the material I had.
Reply to
Dan G
Those are glued on with "cold-flow" adhesives. They take time to "move", so take the removal as slowly as possible. Get a corner up with the fingernails, pull up slowly watching both edges and repairing any places where the covering tears. Watch the adhesive as you pull; you will see strings stretching out between the covering and the plastic. Give them time to pull away from the plastic; if you pull too fast the string will break, leaving a little dot of adhesive on the plastic. And I do mean slowly: 5 seconds or more per inch of progress.
Another possibility: cold-flow adhesives can often be altered by a little weak acid. I often remove labels (such as the new-car-sticker) that I want in one piece, by patting them down with white vinegar and letting them sit for 20 minutes or so. Then they peel off easily, without tearing. This won't work with a plastic protective color, but might work with a kraft- paper cover. (As they say, test this on a scrap before putting your work on the line.)
-- --Pete "Peter W. Meek"
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Reply to
Peter W. Meek
Most of the "sticker remover" stuff you buy is just naptha or similar light petroleum distallate. Same with WD40, it's mostly kerosene or something similar. The soap and water will loosen up the paper so you can roll it off in bits, but you're still left with the hardened-on stickum layer. You need a petroleum-based solvent to get that off. I know very well what you've got, I've got some old Lexan cutoffs that the protective sheet is stuck on pretty good, always have to soak it about a day with naptha before I can start peeling it. Naptha usually works, although I've had some computer tape labels where the adhesive petrified, the label fell off and nothing would clean off the residue. Up until recently, I would have said that naptha was harmless to most any surface, painted or not, but I used it for wipedown on a freshly primed, but dry, surface, and it started lifting the primer. Never used that brand again, that's for sure.
Stan
Reply to
Stan Schaefer
When the plastic is fresh, the biggest problem is making sure that the edge doesn't rip and end the spreading of the pulled paper. After a few months, the glue gets harder and major work needs to be done to insure that it comes off. The brake fluid idea has a lot of merit but the plastic will then need to be washed well to get the brake fluid off.
-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works evevery time it is tried!
Reply to
Bob May
If you are trying to remove the protective paper sheet from a new 4'x8' sheet of Lexan (not a piece of aged, sun hardened scrap), try this method. 1. Take a broomstick, dowel, pipe, or any small diameter stick ( it doesn't have to be round, a piece of 1"x1" hardwood works) about a foot longer than the width of the sheet plastic. 2. Peel back enough of the protective paper to wrap it around the stick (non-sticky side against the stick). A piece of tape can help the paper make the first wrap around it. 3. With the stick extending past the side of the plastic sheet, rotate the stick and the protective paper takes a tight wrap on the stick and pulls away in one piece...
JAK
Reply to
james kaup
One thing I have found is to never pull the paper back over itself. Lift it maintaining an obtuse angle and it will not rip with that hard to remove feather edge.
It is the same principle as wrapping it around a broom stick and rolling it off. The paper is being lifted from the plastic at a slight angle before the stick passes over the stuck part.
DOC wrote:
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
Lighter Fluid (naphtha) works ....
Reply to
Sam Soltan
You can also use a heat gun (hair dryer) but not with the naphtha or other flammables ;-)
Reply to
Sam Soltan
Hey Guys - we have an old piece from 2004 and I was having the same struggles. My wife read the posts, went into the house came out with 3 items: non-acetone nail polish remover, canola oil and Static guard. First item WAS IT.... STATIC GUARD!! Spray a little and pull slowly... repeat. Peeled so easy.
Reply to
AARON WILKINSON
anything in a can from a big box store is mostly Acetone no matter what the can says. Go to an automotive paint store or if your near the coast a marine paint dealer. They will have the real deal thinners.
Reply to
BobK
anything in a can from a big box store is mostly Acetone no matter what the can says. Go to an automotive paint store or if your near the coast a marine paint dealer. They will have the real deal thinners.
Reply to
BobK

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