PLEASE HELP WITH CAST IRON STICK WELDING


I have a Chevy Van with a 6.2 liter naturally aspirated diesel in it that
recently broke its starter mounting pad.
Naturally, I need to fix it or scrap the vehicle (no way for this tenacious
dog). The mounting pad is part of the engine which is cast iron.
I have heard horror stories about arc welding cast iron so, I went to the
welding store and bought a pound of very high nickel welding rod (ouch) and
ran three beads on a Briggs and Stratton flywheel and they were beautiful.
Was it luck or is this normal for high nickel?
Should I Lock-N-Stitch it and then weld it or, or, or?
Here is a Photobucket link of a photo of the mount:
formatting link

I am laying upside down and will have to weld in this position.
I cannot afford to screw this up.
Thanks for any and all help.
j/b
Reply to
justme
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Ouch! First thing Id do is drill a hole through both parts and snug in a dowel pin to hold both parts together prior to welding
Reply to
Gunner
I've done the same, I fixed a bandsaw part with 99% Ni rod and had very good results, so it may just be the nature of the rod (runs very smooth at relatively low amps). If it weren't so expensive, I'd almost be tempted to use it for everything.
My assumption is you're likely to have the best results if you grind a nice big bevel on either piece to give a good sized V to weld in, I'd have worries about any sort of surface weld holding for very long...
--Glenn Lyford
Reply to
glyford
wrote: My assumption is you're likely to have the best results if you grind a
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Absolutely Vee it out. Then, weld a little--tap a little--weld a little--tap a little. You can't preheat and post cool this job, so it is essential not to develop thermal stresses, which can cause cracking as the weld cools. Tapping the bead with a ball-peen hammer causes the metal to flow a little, relieving stresses. The pauses, while you tap, help with cooling the weld.
Also, look for any way to put a bracket on the starter to help support it, so when the truck bounces down the road, the stresses on the weld are minimized.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Thanks, Gunner.....good idea. I will drill the hole, then take this broken part off and grind a vee. The part is just hanging there. Then, I will put back together with dowel pin and weld.
No one mentioned anything about Lock N Stitch so, I will not do that.
j/b
Reply to
justme
Fine, Glenn. Yes, I was really stunned on how easy it was to weld.
I will grind the Vee.
Thanks
j/b
Reply to
justme
Leo, I never knew that a bracket was required. Mine was missing hence the crack. I will ensure that there is the factory bracket on this time and I will peen after welding.
Thanks
j/b
Reply to
justme
"justme" wrote: Leo, I never knew that a bracket was required. Mine was missing hence the
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Dear Justyou. I don't know whether the starter originally had a support bracket. What I meant was that you might be able to put a band around the starter and tie it to something, so that the stresses on your weld are less. This, along with Gunner's suggestion of a steel dowel should make it stronger than new.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Leo, this beast was supposed to have 'the' bracket. Mine did not. It will when I finish and perhaps some extra support, too.
I thought Gunner's suggestion was for a dowel pin for location only. If it serves two purposes then, great.
j/b
Reply to
justme
Indeed..that dowel pin will both locate and help beef up the material if you drill the hole through the thickest portions you can get to.
Two would be better, but I cant tell how much meat you have to work with.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
I did one of these repairs a few years ago and I was able to install a stud in the hole that was broken out. I ground a v in the crack and was concerned about the threads being damaged by the weld. Make sure you can install the starter with a permanent stud in place before you weld it though. This truck was missing the front starter brace too and I think the damage was caused when the starter drive didn't mesh with the ring gear on engagement. Steve
Reply to
Up North
There isn't much, Gunner but I will try to do what I can.
Where can I buy these pins, McMaster?
Joe
Reply to
justme
Steve,
Are you saying to position the stud and THEN WELD THE CRACKED PIECE?
Joe
Reply to
justme
That is what I did. But you have to make sure you can get your starter in and out with the stud installed. Steve
Reply to
Up North
Riteo. Thanks, Steve.
j/b
Reply to
justme
Hell..Id be surprised if any good hardware store didnt have one of those specialty bins with a bin of dowel pins in it. Get one long enough to go completly through both parts if you can and at least 3/16" in diameter
Reply to
Gunner
Good hardware store? Is there such a thing anymore?
I googled them and found a bunch. I also ordered some s.s. ones, .125 by .75long just to have around.
I will try to get as big as I can.
Thanks
j/b
Reply to
justme
Steve,
I wonder if I could give you a call? Please email me
Thanks
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com
Reply to
justme

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