Spot Welding Nuts

Does anyone out there have any expieriance welding (resistance welding?)
nuts on to .083 sheet metal. Need to attatch 3600 5/16 nuts to some .083
mild steel Stampings. Once had heard about something called projection
welding where special nuts were manufactured with protrusions to assist spot
welding of them . Trying to find some info or at least a dirrection to go
Thanks in advance
John Kish
Reply to
John Kish
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Very common method. decent data sheets here:
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You can get them in all sorts of configurations. The ones I've seen used most are square like an old fashioned stove bolt nut, have 4 projections that make the high resistance contact with the base metal, and have a protruding ring that centers the nut in the proper spot. See P/N WP2701 at Ohio Nut. For your 5/16" nuts the pilot hole would be 3/8". If the base metal is already drilled, you can use the no shoulder version but you need some sort of fixture to align the nut with the hole.
It does take a fairly decent sized spot welder. It's been a while so I'm not sure on the minimum for your application. The spot welder setting is quite critical to get a consistent weld. Too little heat and pressure and the nuts break right off. Too much and the threads get crushed and/or melted.
John Kish wrote: > Does anyone out there have any expieriance welding (resistance welding?) > nuts on to .083 sheet metal. Need to attatch 3600 5/16 nuts to some .083 > mild steel Stampings. Once had heard about something called projection > welding where special nuts were manufactured with protrusions to assist spot > welding of them . Trying to find some info or at least a dirrection to go > > > > Thanks in advance > John Kish > > > >
Reply to
RoyJ
Thanks for the info
> Very common method. decent data sheets here: >
formatting link
> You can get them in all sorts of configurations. The ones I've seen used > most are square like an old fashioned stove bolt nut, have 4 projections > that make the high resistance contact with the base metal, and have a > protruding ring that centers the nut in the proper spot. See P/N WP2701 at > Ohio Nut. For your 5/16" nuts the pilot hole would be 3/8". If the base > metal is already drilled, you can use the no shoulder version but you need > some sort of fixture to align the nut with the hole. > > It does take a fairly decent sized spot welder. It's been a while so I'm > not sure on the minimum for your application. The spot welder setting is > quite critical to get a consistent weld. Too little heat and pressure and > the nuts break right off. Too much and the threads get crushed and/or > melted. > > John Kish wrote: >> Does anyone out there have any expieriance welding (resistance welding?) >> nuts on to .083 sheet metal. Need to attatch 3600 5/16 nuts to some .083 >> mild steel Stampings. Once had heard about something called projection >> welding where special nuts were manufactured with protrusions to assist >> spot welding of them . Trying to find some info or at least a >> dirrection to go >> >> >> >> Thanks in advance >> John Kish
Reply to
John Kish
They also have welding data on the site, I don't know if you saw this:
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Eide
> Thanks for the info > >
>> Very common method. decent data sheets here: >>
formatting link
>> You can get them in all sorts of configurations. The ones I've seen used >> most are square like an old fashioned stove bolt nut, have 4 projections >> that make the high resistance contact with the base metal, and have a >> protruding ring that centers the nut in the proper spot. See P/N WP2701 >> at Ohio Nut. For your 5/16" nuts the pilot hole would be 3/8". If the >> base metal is already drilled, you can use the no shoulder version but >> you need some sort of fixture to align the nut with the hole. >> >> It does take a fairly decent sized spot welder. It's been a while so I'm >> not sure on the minimum for your application. The spot welder setting is >> quite critical to get a consistent weld. Too little heat and pressure and >> the nuts break right off. Too much and the threads get crushed and/or >> melted. >> >> John Kish wrote: >>> Does anyone out there have any expieriance welding (resistance welding?) >>> nuts on to .083 sheet metal. Need to attatch 3600 5/16 nuts to some >>> .083 mild steel Stampings. Once had heard about something called >>> projection welding where special nuts were manufactured with protrusions >>> to assist spot welding of them . Trying to find some info or at least >>> a dirrection to go >>> >>> >>> >>> Thanks in advance >>> John Kish
Reply to
Eide
I missed that, looks like it takes a 75 kva welder.
Eide wrote: > They also have welding data on the site, I don't know if you saw this: >
formatting link
> Eide >
> >>Thanks for the info >> >>
>>>Very common method. decent data sheets here: >>>
formatting link
>>>You can get them in all sorts of configurations. The ones I've seen used >>>most are square like an old fashioned stove bolt nut, have 4 projections >>>that make the high resistance contact with the base metal, and have a >>>protruding ring that centers the nut in the proper spot. See P/N WP2701 >>>at Ohio Nut. For your 5/16" nuts the pilot hole would be 3/8". If the >>>base metal is already drilled, you can use the no shoulder version but >>>you need some sort of fixture to align the nut with the hole. >>> >>>It does take a fairly decent sized spot welder. It's been a while so I'm >>>not sure on the minimum for your application. The spot welder setting is >>>quite critical to get a consistent weld. Too little heat and pressure and >>>the nuts break right off. Too much and the threads get crushed and/or >>>melted. >>> >>>John Kish wrote: >>> >>>>Does anyone out there have any expieriance welding (resistance welding?) >>>>nuts on to .083 sheet metal. Need to attatch 3600 5/16 nuts to some >>>>.083 mild steel Stampings. Once had heard about something called >>>>projection welding where special nuts were manufactured with protrusions >>>>to assist spot welding of them . Trying to find some info or at least >>>>a dirrection to go >>>> >>>> >>>> >>>>Thanks in advance >>>>John Kish
Reply to
RoyJ

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