Stick or MIG ?

I just got an order for another AC cage , and since the tombstone is up
and running now I'm considering using it for this one . I used the Weldpak
100 for the last one and felt it was just barely up to the task . I'll be
using 11ga 3/4" square tube , and have on hand 6011 , 6013 , and 7018 in
1/8" for the stick welder - and I can get some 3/32" in those 3 locally . I
have .035" flux core and .025" ER70S6 with CO2 or C25 for the MIG .
Which would y'all use ?
Reply to
Snag
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I'd use 3/32 in either 7014 or 7018, but since you have 1/8 on hand I'd try that first. I have not had great luck getting 60xx rods to run well, but if you have no problems with that then any of the rods you list should work.
I've not played with MIG, so I'll let someone else answer that part.
Reply to
Glenn Lyford
I haven't had problems with 60XX rods , it's what I learned on . The reason I asked is because the thickness of the tube wall is hard up against the max for this 110v MIG . It burns hotter with flux core , but I don't really like the appearance of the weld . I do know from the last one I built that there's no problem with cold lap joints though . Might be a moot point , the potential customer hasn't called . The guy I bought my genset from installed the condenser unit , and might not have contacted the guy with my number yet .
Reply to
Snag
I would use my MIG if it was in a shop, but one is a Miller 180, the other, a Lincoln SP175+, both 220 machines. Apparently, you have hit the limits of the HD 100. That is the difference when buying a 220 over the 110 models.
I did have great luck with the 3/32" 6011 rod, but using it against all directions, both from the factory, and from other welders. I used stinger negative. You can weld the thin stuff, and I used it for field welding ornamental metal, light steel, and repairs. Mostly gates and fences and pool lock boxes.
Here is an example of what it will do. Now, mind you, this is travel downhill, which is looked down upon by any really experienced welder, but, hey, it held for 22 years.
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I have no clue about the weld on the left.
Thin small stuff CAN be welded with 6011 3/32" with stinger negative, and this is a picture of it. I used it exclusively on my portable repair welder for doing pool gates, and all that. I welded a lot of 1/8" flat bar, as you can see here, and it looks okay to me. What do you think?
Just get some rod, and practice. And practice. And practice. You can do it. Major hint: Make a puddle, whip out long enough to cool, stack another puddle, whip out, repeat. Adjust your heat until it just burns, it is easy to get it too hot. If your puddle is melting the adjacent metal, you are either going too slow and building too big a puddle, it's too hot, or you are not directing the arc to the thickest part of the metal being welded.
I think this is just what you need, and it's a hell of a lot easier than dragging around a MIG and bottle, although today's stuff is smaller. But small gas drives will burn this stuff, IIRC, my Lincoln was 16hp. 220 MIG is fine, but you need a long cord.
They look darn fine to me after 22 years. What do you think?
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
I've seen that pic before ...
Couple of things , this is a shop project , the tombstone is an AC machine , and while I get great fusion with flux core in the MIG , the welds ain't purty . I can lay a nice bead with the stick , but am concerned with burn thru on stuff this light with 1/8" rod - which is why I considered 3/32 rod . I went out last night and played with the MIG a bit , and by playing with the feed rate a bit made some very nice butt welds in the type of stock I'd use with the .025/CO2 . Bevelling the joints properly makes a big difference , the nicest ones were bevelled about 45° and almost full thickness . But the guy still hasn't called , I might have scared him off with the price . There are folks out there that are making tacky little cages that are pretty much ineffective for about half my price . The mgmt company I've been doing these for doesn't balk , lose a couple of units at over 1200 bucks apiece and $425 installed doesn't look so high ...
Reply to
Snag
Open up the door. On most models, there is a chart giving the starting points for most thicknesses. Start there.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
BTDT , and for the thickness I'm welding it needs max amps , but I'm varying the wire feed speed . Running at ~7 , I get a bead that stands proud , running at ~ 6 I get a nice frying-bacon sizzle and the bead is a bit flatter . Running the called for amps setting and ~3.5-4 with the flux core I get a nice sizzle and great fusion , but the bead is almost concave . It's a little harder to see exactly what's going on because the bead also has a coating of burned flux on it . Doesn't help that my eyes ain't what they useta be ...
Reply to
Snag

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