CO2 mig versus gasless mig

Tried to ask google and get nowhere (get answers comparing argon mixes etc but none answer the direct question. I have a co2 bottle and can not afford any argon mixes as Australian gas
suppliers are extortionists re rental etc (it costs me over au$400.00 per annum for oxy acetylene without even using it) and the co2 I can fill with dry ice much cheaper. I have been using gasless mig up till now, but was wondering whether CO2 with plain wire or co2 with gasless wire was an option or any better and was trying to find comparison.
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https://www.bernardwelds.com/mig-welding-shielding-gas-basics-p152080
Straight CO2 certainly works though it may not always be the best choice. I converted an old flux-core MIG to CO2 and use it with 0.023" solid wire for auto body sheetmetal, pushing the gun forward to reduce penetration.
The gun & wire polarity is (-) for flux-core, (+) for gas. https://www.millerwelds.com/resources/article-library/mig-welding-the-basics-for-mild-steel
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On 3/22/2019 6:08 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

what I do . I found the arc a bit hotter than C25 , but not as hot as flux core . Your wire size may vary from the .025 I use in my 110v welder Lincoln, depending on how many amps you have available .
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

But is Co2 better than gasless? is it worth trying?
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It is for thin sheetmetal. I can't compare the two on thicker steel because I use 7018 stick instead.
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

I have read most of those none address my question specifically re Co2 versus gasless, as most assume mixed gas.
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On 3/24/2019 1:30 AM, FMurtz wrote:

as the situation calls for . CO2 burns a little cooler than flux core . If I'm welding heavier stock or outdoors I usually go with flux , thinner sections I use gas . I tried C25 mix , with my 110 volt Lincoln Weldpak 100 I felt it was only good for very thin stock .
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Terry Coombs wrote:


Thanks,
I might try it, I was only going to if it is a big improvement but if it is a much of a muchness I may only do it once as changing 5kg reels and fiddling with bottles, regulators etc each time is a nuisance if for not much improvement.
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I gained experience and practiced on various industrial-quality machines in adult night classes in welding and machine shop at schools around this area.
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wrote:

Gasless, also known as Fluxcore, is good for windy situations and when you gotta haul the welder to the job and when the metal might be kinda dirty. But it leaves flux residue behind. CO2 MIG welding spatters more than C25 mix. A spool of 70S6 wire will also last longer than fluxcore because it is pure metal. Fluxcore is more expensive per unit length of weld. The spatter from CO2 MIG welding can be prevented from sticking with anti-spatter spray. I know some folks who just use the non-stick food spray but I never have. Don't bother using CO2 with any type of gas. It is just a waste of gas. There is a type of welding wire called Dual Shield that has a flux core and must be used with a shielding gas. Dual Shield welding can lay down metal very fast but needs a high amperage welder. A 140 amp welder is not powerful enough to run it. Though I have run CO2 in my small MIG welder I don't because mixed gas welds much nicer. Since you say you can fill your tank your self with dry ice then buy a few kilos of dry ice and a 1/2 kilo spool of mild steel wire and give it a try. I assume you also have a pressure regulator and a flow meter for the gas. And your welder has a solenoid operated gas valve. As a last word I am surprised you were unable to find any info online about using straight CO2. You may want to look harder. Try this search term: "mig welding co2 vs c25". I did and got lots of good answers. Like pictures and videos showing the differences, advantages and disadvantages. Eric
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snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

was really looking for comparisons with only Co2 and gasless when most articles keep mentioning mixed gas which is not an option in my case
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wrote:

I gave you those comparisons and even addessed the use of CO2 with fluxcore wire. Which you asked about. If you search MIG vs flux core you will get many hits with lots of good information. I'm still surprised you didn't find your desired info online. Eric
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