Preflow on MIG

I know. I know. That's not really a thing. Still I was welding up some T-handles on thread rod for some tools yesterday. I noticed that for just a
fraction of a second at the beginning of the first weld on a part the weld would be unstable and throw a little spatter. Then it would stabilize and weld perfectly. All I can attribute it to is that it took a tiny fraction of a second for gas to reach the nozzle. Still if the gas solenoid was triggered half a second before the wire was electrified I can't help but think the start would be better. When I shut the welder off I happened to notice my CFH gage was showing a little under 20, and the welder recommends 30 for everything on the flip chart. The other day welding hinges on some thin wall rectangular tube 20 seemed to be fine. Maybe it was just the shape of the t-bolt? Maybe the 30CFH setting hits the nozzle quicker? I have the regulator style flow gages.
P.S. Referring back to my issues with this welder and the bad gas diffuser... I use MIG welding as the fast fall back tool for a lot of things I'd often find other means for in the past. Even my crappy welds look better. I haven't used my little flux core only machine since, although I still would outdoors.
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I hesitate to give advice on welding techniques, but what's worked for me when MIG welding outdoors was blipping out and cutting off a little wire just before starting the bead. The pliers in my left hand are ready to snatch up dropped hot metal too.
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replying to Jim Wilkins, mariagarcia wrote: There are four basic types of welding: MIG, TIG, flux-cored, and stick. The process and welding techniques to be used depending on the application, the types of metal to be welded, and the skill and experience of the welder.
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replying to Jim Wilkins, mariagarcia wrote: There are four basic types of welding: MIG, TIG, flux-cored, and stick. The process and welding techniques to be used depending on the application, the types of metal to be welded, and the skill and experience of the welder.
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