TIG vs Pulse TIG

My primary interest in TIG is to do cleaner aluminum welds with stock that is really outside my practical ability with my MIG setup.
This means I am primarily looking at AC TIG welding. Yes once I have it I may use the DC for other stuff or burn some 7018 with it, but my primary use is aluminum welding. (To be fair my plane old AC cracker box burns E7018 or 7018AC just fine, and I don't run much of it.)
When I first started learning about pulse with MIG (I don't have a pulse MIG) I got the impression it was mostly about heat control and allowed you to make longer continuous beads without dropping out or excessive warping.
My impression with TIG is that heat control is primarily done with a foot pedal or for those who are coordination challenged with a finger control. Just let off when your bead starts to build to wide.
So I am curious. Who uses Pulse TIG and what are the benefits in general?
What are the benefits for welding aluminum (primarily 5000 series and a little 6000 series)?
For a further note, I may be of the bent to start with the machine set closer to the amperage for the material rather than crank it up and adjust with the foot pedal. That may affect the answers for me.
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wrote:

I learned TIG welding back when it was called "Heli-arc" :-) but the foot control is very useful particularly when welding aluminum as when the material heats up, which aluminum does very quickly, or if the thickness varies, or even when you get close to the end/edge you will, to maintain the same width and depth of bead, want to vary the current, usually by small amounts which makes the foot-feed very useful. Also when starting a bead while the parent metal is cold one can sort of mash the pedal until the puddle starts and then ease off to continue the bead.
Rather like gas welding thin stuff where you vary the heat by moving the torch closer or further from the work.
cheers,
John B.
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