Using nails to bridge gap when brazing question.

I was brazing some 1" steel tubing for a project today and I ran across some 3/16" gaps that would not fill easily.
I bent up some steel nails and bent and trimmed them to fit the gaps. I brazed the joint and they bridged very easily.
Now I question the strength.
All feedback along these line would be appreciated.
BoyntonStu
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along these line would be appreciated. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Assuming that the cleanliness and quality of the brazing was all good, I would expect the nail-filled joint to be as strong as the same joint would have been without the nails. However, that is not to say that it is as strong as it would have been if the gap had been small to begin with.
Let's do this mental experiment: Make a test specimen out of three pieces of steel with two braze joints. Make another test specimen out of two pieces of steel with one braze joint. Test them in tension. If you assume all the braze joints are equally strong, the specimens should break at the same load.
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snipped-for-privacy@aaronj.com wrote:

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If you don't know the yield strength amd tensile strength of the nails and the tubing... ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ If they are steel, they will be stronger than the filler material, which is brass. So, if a braze joint was considered acceptable, how would adding steel nails make it weaker?
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heh, strong as nails.
John
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