Video; Stick Welding Electrode 1/2 a second of footage spread over 2 minutes

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i a_1355724091
Annoying music & 1/4 of a second would have been sufficient, but still
interesting.
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This is very amazing. Thanks for sharing.
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Very cool.

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You can see the slag (darker fluid) and the molten metal (lighter fluid) - interesting

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On Tue, 18 Dec 2012 09:34:56 +0000, Richard Smith wrote:

This video was made with a system using monochromatic illumination with a matching bandpass filter on the camera, which blocks almost all of the light emitted by the arc and almost none from the illumination. See US patent 4,225,771 for details, from 1980. While this method has been used to monitor remotely controlled welding in nuclear applications since its development, this is the first video made with it that I have seen on the Internet.
I saw a very interesting video made with this method in the mid 80's at a nuclear welding conference, where they demonstrated pulsed GMAW both in the now common drop per pulse mode and in spray mode, where a high frequency pulsed component on top of the base DC was used to adjust the width to depth ratio of the weld over a very large ratio. I thought this would be widely adopted by now, but I haven't seen much of it, perhaps just because I haven't been looking much.
Glen
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I think Lincoln tried for years to sell industry on it to no avail, then dual-shield came along and rendered hard wire MIG obsolete on heavy sections.
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