Welders Glass for viewing Solar Eclipse

I've been given Welder's glass with the following stamped on it, EN169 11
MUREX
Anyone know if these are safe for viewing a Solar Eclipse?
Thanks
Reply to
Gareth Slee
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To clarify, Two lenses have EN169 11 MUREX, and the other two have EN169 SH11 stamped on them.
Reply to
Gareth Slee
When we had the last eclipse in the UK the welding shops did sell a lot of filters which normally there was not a lot of call for, like 16 or more IIRC. From what I remember a shade 11 is not sufficient to provide adequate protection for direct viewing. A good place to ask, if you can't find the info on the web, would be a local astronomy club.
Gareth Slee wrote:
Reply to
David Billington
Use a pinhole in a sheet of something opaque. You'll get a nice projection of the eclipse. I remember one partial eclipse here in Oregon. It was a clear spring day, with the sun slanting through the trees making a nice dappled shade -- except that the light spots weren't round.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I've *heard* that AWS#14 shade is good for viewing the Sun during eclipses.
Because the local welding suppliers get a rush sale of these every time an eclipse is coming up.
That is in Cambridge, UK - where there are astronomers and scientists.
Richard S.
Reply to
Richard Smith
I have used welding hoods with #10 filters in the past without pain. My seeing eye dog is not familiar with MUREX numbering, but he says that looks like a #11 filter which should be darker than a #10.
I can't speak to whether you might get damage without it causing pain.
Bob
Reply to
MetalHead
I have watched solar eclipses using two stacked arc welding filters. The disc is clearly visible, but way less bright than a full moon.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
I can't comment on whether a #11 will be dark enough, but I'd strongly encourage you to also add a piece of clear plastic, or wear sunglasses with plastic lenses as well as they will kill any UV which the welding lens (being glass) will not do as efficiently. Pretty well all forms of plastic are very effective absorbers of UV.
Cheers Glenn
Reply to
Glenn
Huh? If the filters are for any form of arc welding they have to be good at stopping UV. You can get a sunburn on bare skin from TIG so there's plenty of UV there.
If I remember the discussions here about auto-darkening helmets, even if you forget to turn them on and get a quick flash from the arc, it won't really hurt your eyes because the filter, even undarkened, will stop most of the UV.
Now don't take this to say any old arc welding filter will be good for looking at the sun. Just that any filter dark enough to look at the sun should also block the UV.
Reply to
xray
Don't forget that most helmets have a plastic safety cover over the lens...
That said, I once had a Tasco telescope that came with a "sun filter" that screwed into the eyepiece - about a #11, IIRC - for direct viewing of the sun's corona.
Reply to
RAM³
Tasco - dangerous. Not so much for the eye - but the telescope. The lenses overheat and crack.
My 8" telescope uses a front 8" wide type of gold covered filter. Lower cost ones have a 4" circle on one side. Keeps the eye safe and the glass cool. Martin
Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member
RAM³ wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
I haven't seen a spectrum for UV output from a welder but suspect it is mostly longer wave UV. There is substantial short wave UV from the sun. Moot point whether a welding filter is designed to filter the same bandwidth of UV. That's why I suggested the plastic. My helmet has a protective clear plastic element in front of the filter. It all helps.
Better safe than sorry.
G
Reply to
Glenn
This one had a cap-on-a-cap: a silver-dollar-sized cap on the larger 4.5" cap.
Solar viewing was through the small hole, IIRC.
[I gave the 'scope to my sister over 20 years ago for the benefit of her pre-teen sons and haven't seen it since.]
Reply to
RAM³
It's good to have some filtering and contrasting to show edges and lines. It is used to look for the black holes that appear on the sun - sun-spots. And when lucky - a loop of plasma flowing in the magnetic field in an arc.
Martin
Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member
RAM³ wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Try looking through a piece of steel - it's dark enough.
Greg
Reply to
ConcreteArtist
I did the same thing about fifteen years ago during a pretty good eclipse in Las Vegas. Just a piece of paper with a hole poked in it. I was surprised how good an image I got with it, and wasn't looking even towards the sun.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
probabably the potential for staring at it longer than would otherwise be possible...due to the overall reduced brightness
Brent Phili> What DOES make looking at an eclipse so much worse than looking at the
Reply to
Gerald Cooper
What DOES make looking at an eclipse so much worse than looking at the sun or a regular day?
Reply to
Brent Philion
As it gets darker, the iris of the eye opens wider allowing for more potential damage to the retina and rods & cones. Similar in effect to dark sunglasses without any UV protective lens. At full eclipse, it's like twilight and the iris is nearly wide open.
This site will give you more than you ever wanted to know about eclipse viewing safety.
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Reply to
Mike H.

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