10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession

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The commandments:

1. Thou shalt not weld on an unpurged tank
2. Thou shalt secure thy tanks
3. Thou shalt clean thy work carefully
4. Thou shalt place thy work in jigs
5. thou shalt not weld near flammable materials
6. thou shalt take great care of thy tools
7. thou shalt have good ventilation
8. thou shalt use goggles
9. thou shalt wear gloves
10. thou shalt ground thy work

My confession (and excuses/BS)...

#1 I don't purge - that's done for me when I get them refilled.
I could purge the hoses but the valves leak enough that it doesn't
matter anyway (though my new torch does hold the acetylene and I would
consider it).

#2 secure?  - just set the tank on the cart with the loose-fitting
lasso-chain.  It ain't gonna fall from there.

#3 Cleaning - does paint count as cleaning?  Bondo-cover?

#4 jiggs! - usually a pair of vice-grips or a magnet will do.   Any
method of propping it together is good enough to get a bendable-tack.
Then a little heating/bending helps.  But no matter what the warping
while welding is more sever than any jig will hold, - so keeping
something straight requires side-to-side time-share-welding and
possibly some post-weld heating/bending.

#5 weld near ... flammable materials -  if a fire starts just take a
big breath and blow it out!  What-r-ya-fraid-of?  Big-bad-bondo?
Undercoat? Paint-fire?  Baaaahhhhh shoooo - poof no problem.

#6 if the tool box fills with rain just dump the water out.  When
leaves fill the box just blow them off w/ some oxygen or an
air-compressor.

#7 ventilation -  for what?  Just take a big breath and do the job.
When you need another breath just blow the smoke away first so when you
inhale you get fresh air.

#8 goggles are goofy - a cool pair of #5 shades are all one needs.
Sure sometimes the glasses under the shades get pit-marks but by the
time those build up it's time for a new pair anyway (from rubbin em
on e old shirt).

#9 gloves - an occasionally burning reinforces intelligence (or
recognition of one's own stupidity)

#10 grounding - not with torches!  In fact, if you don't keep your
work up off of the ground you get exploding pieces of the ground
hitting you.

OK so I'm a SINNER now what?  I DO BELIEVE IN JESUS! and Thankfully
faith in Jesus brings forgiveness.
Elliott
PS:  Merry christmas and thanks to this NG for good reading!


Re: 10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

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The Unpurged tank indicates thusly :  take a 55 gallon tank that was marked
JP4 jet fuel on the side.  Plan on making an open top barrel.  What do you do ?

While a young man, a welder started to do just that.  He was ill trained or
not on this game.  He met his maker when his cutting torch went through the
top and ignighted fumes remaining in the tank.  The 55 gallon was de-topped,
so was the welder.  Both at once in  a large explosion.

Martin
Merry Christmas! Happy Honica! Happy Kwanza!

--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: 10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession
Commandment 11.  Thou shalt wear ear protection.  Molten dingleberries can
end your career in less than a second.



Re: 10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession
I once used my hat to extinguish a car's gas-line that was burning near
the gas tank.  Sadly, it ruined my hat.

And, the 1 gas-tank that I did weld (a 5 gal metal can) still "popped"
even though I had filled it with water.  Don't think I'd want to
weld/cut something that had been filled with JP4.  But in that context
I guess "purge" makes more sense.  Interesting and possibly related is
how pipes pop when welding them sealed (eg: using black-pipe to make a
truck rack - a cross piece ends up sealed).

Anybody want to make a "Fire-stories" thread?  Maybe it's a little too
embarresing for those of us who have been welding for 30+ years.


Re: 10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession
My Dad, who was an old barn stormer aviator, told me a story when I was a
kid of a fellow who tried to repair a gas tank used in an airplane.  They
thoroughly steam washed the inside of the tank, drained it washed it again,
etc.  When he went to weld it he hit a pocket of gas still residing in a
corner of the tank.  It blew up and killed the poor fellow .....


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Re: 10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession

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How do you thoroughly wash the inside of a tank when you can't get at it?  I
was just wondering because I have been trying to do it.  ;-)

Steve



Re: 10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession
    To take a torch to a tank of questionable vapor content, fill it with
water leaving just enough room for the torch to let the slag out.  Similar
to brazing up a car fuel tank, but you have to fill it with gas first.  Let
the tank vent nicely, somewhere other than near the torch, and gently braze
away.  The clincher is that it is the vapor that's flammable, not the
liquid.  I remember doing some kind of tank one time and it had water or
something in it and there was enough vapor being generated that it slowly
burned at the filler neck while I worked.  The fact that there wasn't enough
oxygen inside the tank to support combustion kept flame outside, and the
steam coming from the work site kept it down also.
    As far as vapor and burns, I was welding up a can crusher when I was in
high school (they weren't sold commercially in the early 80's) and the piece
of pipe must have let some unburned acetylene out the other end.  I was
doing fine for a good while until I started to realize that while my arm was
kinda warm I was also smelling burning hair.  I stepped back and the sleeve
of my shirt had just about all burned away and you could see a gentle blue
flame still coming out of the other end of the pipe.  Nothing but a red
spot, but the shirt was a total loss.  The weldor I was apprenticing to was
very adamant about the clothes I wore while in his shop, and the cotton
shirt kept me from making a trip to the emergency room to have polyester
pulled off of burnt skin.

|
| > My Dad, who was an old barn stormer aviator, told me a story when I was
a
| > kid of a fellow who tried to repair a gas tank used in an airplane.
They
| > thoroughly steam washed the inside of the tank, drained it washed it
| > again,
| > etc.  When he went to weld it he hit a pocket of gas still residing in a
| > corner of the tank.  It blew up and killed the poor fellow .....
| >
| >
| How do you thoroughly wash the inside of a tank when you can't get at it?
I
| was just wondering because I have been trying to do it.  ;-)
|
| Steve
|
|


Re: 10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession
I wasn't there (I wasn't even born yet) but as I understood it there was an
access port, or filler port, and they repeatedly blasted the inside of the
tank with a steam cleaner, and then let it drain.  I have heard of trying
this by filling the tank with an inert gas, but I wouldn't do it under any
circumstances.


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a
They
I




Re: 10 Commandments of Welding, And my confession
Commandment 11 ==>  rewording to commandment 8.


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