A Hinge and a Monocote Question

I'm restoring an old model plane given to me by my dad some thirty years ago - maybe longer! Anyway the CA hinges were shot, and I just
cut through them along the hinge line. I was able to re-slot where the old CA hinges once were, and everything looks OK. Now my question: When I CA the new hinges in, will the CA stick to the remnants of the old CA hinges?
The next question: After removing the old Monocote, I discovered that some of the balsa was soaked with fuel. What should I do to ensure the new covering adheres?
Ciao,
Mr Akimoto
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Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:

Chances are the CA will not adhere (or adhere properly ) in the slots where the old hinges were since CA has already been absorbed into the wood. Make new slots next to where the old hinges were, drill a 1/32" hole in the center of the slot (to insure proper CA distribution to the hinge ) and install the hinges in the new slots using THIN CA.

Use K2R spot cleaner. Spray the fuel soaked wood with this and let dry, then brush it off. You will need to do this several times to get the fuel residue out. As an alternative you can sprinkle corn starch on the affected areas, rub it in, then in a few minutes bruch it off. Again, you will need to do this several times.
After you have removed as much fuel from the wood as possible, coat the area with BalsaRite (be sure to use the correct one - there is one for film covering and one for fabric coverings ), or Sig "StixIt" (I prefer to use the StixIt.

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On Fri, 26 Aug 2005 07:57:28 GMT, Ted Campanelli
[snip]
I haven't been able to find this stuff for years.. Where do you get it??? (is it still available?)
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If you are a California person, it's not readily available in stores (maybe other states as well). However, if you do a Google search for K2R Spot Remover, you will find dozens of mail order places to buy it.
"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in message wrote:

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Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:

You can also use corn starch. Sprinkle it on the affected areas, rub it in, let dry and brush off. You WILL need to do several treatments to get the oil/fuel residue out of the wood.
I suggest then coating the area with SIG Stix-It or BalsaRite to block any remaining residue and to insure a good bond for the covering.
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On Wed, 26 Oct 2005 16:05:30 GMT, Ted Campanelli

Cool. I'll give that a try.. Thx!
Thx to you too Ted. I found a couple places online to find K2R. I'll try the cornstarch method 1st.
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Interestingly, I found that a hot monocote iron drew the oil out of the balsa, and I wiped it off. The new Econocote went down without a problem.
Ciao,
Mr Akimoto
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You can also use some gentle heat from your heat gun on the oil-soaked areas to 'boil off' some excess gunk before using K2r or whatever.
Cheers -- \_________Lyman Slack________/ \_______Flying Gators R/C___/ \_____AMA 6430 LM____ / \___Gainesville FL_____/ Visit my Web Site at www.LymanSlack.com

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That works.
I have also had good luck using a heat lamp, like the kind used at a fast food burger stand to keep food warm.
Using the above method, oil will come to the surface in beads, if it is really oil soaked. Just gently lay paper towels down on the surface and the oil is sucked into the paper towel. Just don't leave the lamp unattended.
Ed Cregger
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Chances are you would be better off cutting new slots near the old locations; make them thin and drill a 1/16: hole in the center to insure CA penetrates.
As far as the messy balsa, use K2R if you can get it in your state or use corn starch. Brush either in, allow to dry, than brush off (possible light sanding. If the area is really fuel soaked, you can heat it slightly with your MonoKote gun and the goo will ooze out.
You might have to use some brush on adhesive.
Cheers -- \_________Lyman Slack________/ \_______Flying Gators R/C___/ \_____AMA 6430 LM____ / \___Gainesville FL_____/ Visit my Web Site at www.LymanSlack.com

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Thanks for the info guys.
I was afraid of the answers I might get regarding the CA hinges. Oh well the longest path often turns out to be the shortest!
Now I have to rush home and find an X-Acto saw to cut out the old rotten hinges.
Ciao,
Mr Akimoto
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Just cut the old hinges! No need to dig them out. Leave them there. Make new slots next to the old hinges and put in NEW hinges!

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Jim:
Moving the hinges to either side wasn't an option. First there wasn't room on one side, and on the other, they were just too close together.
I simply used an X-Acto saw and a hobby knife and cut them out. I then epoxied in new balsa pieces. The hardest part was sanding the new pieces flush with the surface, since I didn't have the right thickness stock - darn!
BTW, I made the new slots with a Great Planes Hinge Slotting Tool. I bought it for just this job, and I'm glad that I did. Cutting hinges by hand is the biggest pain in the ass known to man!
Ciao,
Mr Akimoto
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Here's what I did for the same problem:
1) Dig out old hinge with Exacto knife by cutting above and below old hinge and then "picking" the old hinge out. There is a 50% chance it will come out easy.
2) The slot is now much bigger (thickness) than it should be, using a finger nail sanding board (thin as possible from Wal-Mart) sand slot to nearest larger size of balsa. i.e. make opening 1/16", 3/32" etc thick . This width depends on how "gracefully" the old hinge came out.
3) Cut balsa to correct size and "lather" it up with whatever glue you prefer (trial fit first). I like to use the yellow hobby glue or good old Ambroid. CA thick can be used.
4) Slide balsa with glue into slot and let dry
5) Slot new wood and install hinges per usual
6) Drill hole top to bottom thru the hinge on the leading edge of elevator and trailing edge of stabilizer to accept a round tooth pick.
7) Repeat step #3 and slide toothpick through hole, let dry and sand smooth
8) Give it a trial tug
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"AKIMOTO":
How big is that oldie ?? If not too big, maybe you can eliminate the CA hinges and just use th monokote or other covering material as the hinge. I have done tha with some 40 size planes (not much force there). Just make sure yo "glue" the monokote or whatever in such a manner that the contro surface can deflect fully in each direction. This also closes up th gap !
-- indoruwe ----------------------------------------------------------------------- indoruwet's Profile: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/member.php?u891 View this thread: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t@906
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