Barrel Rolls

I fly an Aerobird Extreme. Can anyone tell me if it's possible to do a
barrel roll in one of these, and if yes, please give stick details so I
can try.
Cheers
RD
Reply to
robertdownes25
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Oops! He said "barrel roll" not "axial roll."
I am not so sure about the "V" tail comment either. He can get a lot of altitude, give full power and a little down to get plenty of speed. Pull up into a climb and at about 45 degree climb, go to full right rudder, as soon it starts over, give full down, while holding full right rudder. As it completes the roll, give full up because it might be going a little slow by then.
This should do it if the throws are adequate, the speed adequate, and the wings don't come apart because it might not have been stressed for that.
There is only one way of finding out.
Ken, who could barrel roll everything he owned...but a rte Sopwith Tripe.
Reply to
Ken Cashion
Should be able to. A barrel roll is nothing more than a horizontal spiral dive.
Put plane in a mild dive to build up speed, pull back on stick and when starts pointing upward, hit rudder. Due to motor torque, it will roll to one side better than the other.
IMHO, should be doable with V-tail mixer.
These type planes may / usually not have enough forward speed to loop or barrel roll, so a mild to moderate dive is required to build enough speed to stunt.
Reply to
High Plains Thumper
True. I have done it flying with escapement RO. But the speed is more critical...a smidgen too slow and it does a reverse Immelmann; too fast and it does a great barrel roll -- followed by a stall.
Ken
Reply to
Ken Cashion
I used to perform loops, stall turns and brief inverted flight with rudder only, in addition to rolls and consecutive rolls.
The Testor's Skyhawk RTF and its manual were very good at performing and teaching one to perform rudder only aerobatics. That was available in 1969. Memories...
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
I did one with mine unintentionally into an unexpected 20 knot gust last weekend, but alas the results weren't pretty... when it hit the ground the wing shifted about 45 deg and the prop cut a nice gash through the trailing edge. Thank god for tape. It ain't pretty, but it still flies.
Homer.
Reply to
Homer Simpson
I have always wanted to build a Rudder Bug but with modern equipment and rig it with push buttons on the transmitters for bang-bang rudder only. Then take it to the field and let the hot-shot 3-D pilots demonstrate their flying skills with it.
What maneuver do you do before two consecutive inside loops?
A three-round, spiral dive.
Ken
Reply to
Ken Cashion
I am currently in the process of building an electric Rudder Bug, it does have some mods, about 85-90% of original size with rudder, elevator and speed control. I do have the plans for the orginal Rudder Bug and as near as I can remember they are true, I was about 12 at the time when I saw it.
I don't remember how many hours I spent at Cleveland Model and Supply on 45th and Lorain Ave.
Roy
Reply to
Roy Minut
Good for you. You will be the envy of the flying field...at least the envy of the old-time modelers.
And I bet those were wonderful hours...I spent my hours flipping through Air Trails magazine and American Hobby Center adverts. I just couldn't decide what to order. This would be with me today looking through Road and Track trying to decide if the Ferrari or the Lamborginni would be the deal.
But with AHC, I finally decided...the ignition Arden 09 and the Berkeley Bug control-liner package...complete with a coil, batteries, control lines, handle, etc.
About the time I was getting it to run good, Ray Arden invented the glow plug, and through my forwardness, I managed to get the science teacher to let me mix my fuel from high school chem. lab supplies. I must have been a pretty good talker because I was only in the sixth grade when I did this. This might be hard to do today...we were more responsible and trustworthy in those days -- and our parents were not at all likely to hold someone else accountable for our stupidity -- and sue the crap out of them. .
Ken
Reply to
Ken Cashion
Aww....come on Ken , not all the 3-D pilots are too young to remember that stuff. Some of us old farts like 3D :-)
The other Ken .........Day
Reply to
Bill
Forgot to finish my post....LOL...I am an old fart. That would be real neat. I would enjoy that a lot. A guy came to the field a couple years ago with an Ace "Littlest Stik" with a "Galloping Ghost" and an .020 engine. It flew great. I don't know who the guy was as he was here on vacation from DC. I would love to see that little fella fly again.
My son built one of those Stiks when he was a teenager but we never did get a radio system in it. He finally made it into a free flight and it didn't last long :-(
Ken Day
Reply to
Bill
You are right, Other Ken. I should have thought of that. Old pilots like 3D flying because the airplane is big and up close...they can still see that one.
I have always wondered about the "3D" aspects. All of my models were 3D models...wait! No, I remember one that was only 2D. Out and straight down.
Ken For images of music, models, etc., --
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Luddite Publishers -- "Ball Turret Gunner; Weather Bad/Flak Heavy"
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Reply to
Ken Cashion
Ken, I remember the "Littlest Stik" and I had some PeeWees and one TD02. The TD was a really good engine. It powered my first really successful R/C (escapement).
I thought it funny that the "littlest Stik" came in a plastic bag. I got one when I was an Ace/World dealer. I checked the size of my radio gear and gave the kit away. I had the construction article for it but it went away when I sold my model magazine collection on eBay. I see that Nostalgia Pattern is making a come-back. It is a good idea but will need to be controlled with an iron hand, otherwise, they will end up carbon, kevlar, and foam-cored wings and Schnerle engined Kraft Kwik-Flies.
The new stuff is not necessarily good because it is new.
The old stuff is not necessarily bad because it is old. (I am a Luddite).
Ken For images of music, models, etc., --
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Luddite Publishers -- "Ball Turret Gunner; Weather Bad/Flak Heavy"
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Reply to
Ken Cashion
I had a .15 powered Rudder Only model called The Aeroflyte Invader. It was a an Australian kit some years ago. I built a replica a few years ago and fitted a regular servo on the rudder and on the engine. I can loop and roll and do touch and go's. Great fun between flying my Jets.
Regards
Tom Watson Sydney Australia
Reply to
news
HI ken,
No they are all wimpy kids, and they can't do it. My next step is to make a Push Button switch and have the real full left,full right rudder. Do you remember, One push for left, two pushes for right, three pushes and hold for motor.
That's is when it gets interesting.
Reply to
news
I had an early escapement. One hold for turn and one hold for turn the other direction. I had to remember which way was the last turn. If I wanted to repeat a turn, I had to blip it to get it past that direction and then hold. If I were making a large turn without losing much altitude, I had to make a lot of little turns the same direction -- I had be really careful. This always happened downwind where we did most of our flying anyway...not on purpose, but with that style of rudder only, that is just where we ended up sometimes (generally).
Later, I had a self-neutralizing escapement where one hold was always the same direction and a blip, hold would always be the other direction.
I didn't have throttle control until I went to GG and was using a Rand Actuator. The strange thing was that going to one of several engine settings, the elevator and rudder would actually swing a little further than when using just them.
I got into a lot of trouble testing a tractor canard and I couldn't get it to rotate and take off. It had a power trim problem with the engine mounted on the leading edge of the vertical fin. I kept putting more trim in.
For five take-off attempts it raced down the paved runway and headed for the grass at the end of the strip and my trike nose wheel was getting bent up.
I would hit low throttle and let it cycle through to idle. This was not real prompt.
Finally, I put a lot of up trim in it and it was getting light and I thought I would get an ROG that time, but it was approaching the grass again, and I knew that one more tweak would have it flying good. I hit low throttle, the canard control service dipped a little further than usual and the nose lifted, the delta wings got lift, it lifted off really nicely and it started climbing...as the engine was going to idle.
I hit full throttle but it first had to cycle through idle and back up to full power. As power went away, the nose dropped and it pointed straight down. That was the direction it was pointing as the engine came back full power.
Now that I think about it...there are images of this thing on my old model photo site. I just looked, yes, Models 1962 - 1990, images Z41 and Z43; "SST."
Ken
Reply to
Ken Cashion
When I finally graduated from college in 1962, a lot of the flyers in m
club were flying reed systems. Very few had the "educated" thumb necessary to fly smoothly with this system so most just flopped arroun the sky from one unusual attitude to another. Most were longing for th day when they could afford one of the new proportional systems tha would allow them to do smooth, thunderbird style flying. Today everybody is flying proportional radios but still bouncing around th sky just like we used to do with reeds except they now call it 3D an do it deliberately. This is progress
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