Basic servo control question

Hi - this is probably one of the most basic questions... but then again
maybe there is more than one way to do things... Setting up the servo
channels and transmitter radio controls. How do most folks align a 4 channel
system? Rudder and Elevator on right stick... and aileron/throttle on right?
Thanks again for the help...
Newbie
Reply to
Newbee
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In the U.S.A. most flyers use aileron and elevator on right stick, and throttle and rudder on the left stick. I don't know about other countries. Joe L.
Reply to
JosLvng
Depends where you're from.......
The control layout you just described is called Mode1. It's the most commonly used mode in Australia. In the US however, Mode2 is most common. Mode2 is Aileron and Elevator on the right stick, Throttle and Rudder on the left.
Of course, there's always exceptions to the norm.......I'm in Australia, but I fly Mode2 :-)
I'm not convinced that there's a good enough reason to chose one mode over the other. I started flying fixed wing on Mode1 many years ago, but never really totally got a handle on it. I had a rather long break (good number of years) and then got back into the hobby with a helicopter. I tried flying it on Mode1.....not a chance. Couldn't get my brain around the fact that the cyclic controls were on different sticks! I swapped it all over to Mode2 and bingo.....immediate success :-) I now fly fixed wing on Mode2 as well. I reckon you should fly whatever mode you're comfortable with. Of course, the only drawback with flying a different mode to everyone else around you is no-one else can fly your models and visa versa........maybe that's not such a bad thing though ;-)
Self proclaimed 'gun' fixed wing pilot - "Hey mate, can I have a go of your helicopter?" Me - "Sorry mate....you fly the wrong mode." :-)
MrBonk
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Reply to
MrBonk
Newbie- Welcome to the fraternity. In the US, the most common setup is elevator and aileron on the right stick, throttle and rudder on the left. This is referred to as Mode 2. Mode 1 swaps the throttle to the right stick and elevator to the left. It is used by a minority in the US, but seems to be more popular in less developed parts of the world (it's too quiet here - let's start an international incident)
Abel
Reply to
Abel Pranger
All Modes are explained om the opening page of my website
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Much will depend on the club you fly with. It is wise to choose the same mode as your instructor, so he needs not rethink your mode when in a tight spot.
BTW, we fly mode 4. Don't ask why...
Reply to
Pé Reivers
Actually, if your instructor flies a mode different then the country he's in - for example, flying mode 1 in mode 2 country, the USA), he is hurting the student very badly.
Reply to
Bill
Personally, I find Mode2 much more 'natural'. Particularly with the helicopter, where it means you have both cyclic controls on the one stick. I only know of a couple of other ppl who fly Mode2, one of which is a guy I taught to fly. The other is a masters pattern flier, so there must be *something* in it :-)
I'm completely self taught, starting with 3 channel gliders. When I finally progressed to powered flight, the radio I was sold didn't have a buddy connector, so I had to do it the hard way :-) A bloke at the club test flew the model for me (a Royal Air 40 trainer, IIRC) and then handed me the tx. This was all on Mode1. I had some minor difficulty coming to grips with the throttle control, but other than that, no major problems. *BUT*, I never got totally comfortable with it. IE. I never got to the point where I didn't have to *think* about it anymore.
When I swapped over to Mode2 (after getting back into the hobby in early 2000 with the helicopter), I felt 'comfortable' with it, rather than feeling like I had to *really* concentrate on it. These days, with either planes or the helicopter, my thumbs just seem to know what to do......I don't have to think about flying, unless I'm learning a new manoeuvre (for pattern) or something of course. Strangely enough, it took virtually no time at all to make the switch......I didn't find myself having to fight the Mode1 habits or anything.......I guess that means I should have been flying Mode2 the whole time!
MrBonk
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versa........maybe
Reply to
MrBonk
Depends on the radio sets actually. These days, computer radios can handle mixed modes on a buddy. My 8UHPS is perfectly capable of being set to Mode2 while the buddy tx is on Mode1 (or *any* mode for that matter). It's controlling the actual channels, irrespective of what stick on the student TX they're on. So, if your instructor has a radio that is capable of mixed mode buddying, it makes no difference at all.
MrBonk
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Reply to
MrBonk
Very true MrBonk. Due to physical reasons, I have to use Mode 3. I have two Futaba 6XAS'; the master is on Mode 2 and the student is Mode 3. When I'm ready to solo, I'll fire up my transmitter. This did increase the cost of getting into the hobby, but that's what it took in my situation.
I'll probably always have the two transmitters. That way, if I get a new plane, one of the skilled pilots can do the first flight and help me get it trimmed before I try it on my own. Maybe some day I'll have the skill to do a maiden flight on my own.
Carrell
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Depends on the radio sets actually. These days, computer radios can handle mixed modes on a buddy. My 8UHPS is perfectly capable of being set to Mode2 while the buddy tx is on Mode1 (or *any* mode for that matter). It's controlling the actual channels, irrespective of what stick on the student TX they're on. So, if your instructor has a radio that is capable of mixed mode buddying, it makes no difference at all.
MrBonk
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Reply to
Carrell

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