Remote Control

I have a Tower Hobbies Tower Trainer 40 MKII 4-Channel RTF 62". I just put it together and then was testing how it responds to the remote
control. When I push up on the right control stick the rudder moves and when I push sideways on the left control stick the elevator moves. How can I fix this? The manual didn't say.
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You have the servos plugged into the wrong channels on the recvr.

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The wires are switched around on the servos, how do I switch the wires around so that the elevator and rudder arn't reversed?
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On 9/16/2004 14:48, Chewbacca007 wrote:

Are you saying that the control stick that should operate the rudder is actually operating the elevator, or that when you provide an elevator-up command on the transmitter, you actually get elevator down on the plane?
If the former, you've got the line to the elevator servo plugged in to the receiver in the jack designated for the rudder. Unplug it and plug it into the correct jack.
If the latter, check with the transmitter manual for a feature called "Servo Reversal" and reverse the servos that are operating in the wrong direction.
Did the plane and radio come with any literature or instructions?
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You have the servos plugged into the wrong slots in the receiver. The ailerons are channel 1, elevator channnel 2, throttle channel 3, rudder channel 4. Right aileron should move upwards, left downwards when the right stick is moved right and vice versa. Elevator should move up when the right stick is pulled down, down when pushed up. Throttle depends on your engine and how its mounted, but should open when the left stick is pushed up and close when the left stick is all the way down. Rudder is left when left stick is left and right when right. I seriously hope you have somebody available to trim out the plane and adjust the throttle properly along with teaching you to fly. Your entrance into the hobby might be about to end abruptly... Honestly, it is VERY difficult to teach yourself to fly. It can be done, but you will go thru quite a lot of balsa, sweat and tears before it happens. Been there, done that.
--
Dan
AMA605992
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Sure hope you go out and find an instructor..
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Ya gotta 'member that JR is different ! ! !
David
On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 04:16:51 GMT, "Fubar of The HillPeople"
snip

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On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 01:05:23 GMT, #$%^ snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (David AMA40795 / KC5UH) wrote:

JR:
1 = Throttle 2 = Aileron 3 = Elevator 4 = Rudder
Others, I think:
1 = Aileron 2 = Elevator 3 = Throttle 4 = Rudder
            Marty
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The RTF version of the Tower Trainer comes with a Tower (rebadged Futaba) radio system.
I'd guess the factory plugged the servos into the wrong channel, and the manual probably doesn't mention the channel numbers since it is, after all, "ready to fly" as soon as you open the box.
Chewbacca, plug in the servos as mentioned by Fubar. Then, if any channels work backwards, flip the 'servo reversing' switches for the channels that are wrong. Looking at the photo to the Tower web site, it appears that the switches are on the front of the transmitter, under the "System 3000" logo.
Carrell
I have a Tower Hobbies Tower Trainer 40 MKII 4-Channel RTF 62". I just put it together and then was testing how it responds to the remote control. When I push up on the right control stick the rudder moves and when I push sideways on the left control stick the elevator moves. How can I fix this? The manual didn't say. ==============================
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HOW do I go about fixing this problem? Can I get some instructions because I don't want to ruin my plane that cost me a lot of money.
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| HOW do I go about fixing this problem? Can I get some instructions | because I don't want to ruin my plane that cost me a lot of money.
Get an instructor.
Seriously, get some help. Somebody with experience with R/C planes. If you have never flown one before, you're likely to turn this one into a pile of balsa wood splinters within 30 seconds of taking off.
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com
"What a waste it is to lose one's mind. Or not to have a mind is being
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Wow thanks for your help... I figured it out myself, there probably isn't an instructer around for hundreds of miles
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Where do you live, in Siberia? It is hard to imagine an area like that in the US.
-- Paul McIntosh http://www.rc-bearings.com

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Paul McIntosh wrote:

Death valley?

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Death Valley has several substantial cities within 100 miles. Like Las Vegas, Ridgcrest, Lone Pine, Mammouth Lakes.
-- Paul McIntosh http://www.rc-bearings.com

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| Wow thanks for your help...
Sarcasm?
| I figured it out myself, there probably isn't an instructer around | for hundreds of miles
Seriously, get some in-person help. It doesn't have to be somebody who calls themself an instructor, you don't need a buddy box (but it would be a good idea), but do get some help from somebody who has some experience with glow powered R/C planes. Even a few minutes of help from them will greatly increase your chance of success.
You've found (and corected, hopefully) one of several dozen little things that could make your plane unflyable. It's almost impossible to get one of these glow planes ready to fly when you've never flown one before -- you just don't know what to check. Have you broken in your engine? (If you don't, you may ruin it!)
And even then, assuming that everything is installed, adjusted and trimmed properly, the odds of somebody who has never flown an R/C plane (even somebody who has a pilot's license) taking off and landing successfully is almost nil.
The small park fliers fare a good deal better -- the electric motors are less tricky to get running, they fly slower and are likely to survive a crash, but this plane (0.40 sized, glow powered) flies a lot faster and is a lot more fragile. Even a hard landing will do damage, and a good crash is likely to destroy the airframe.
Not only is it fast, it's heavy, with a big metal thing up front. If it hits something or somebody, it's going to do some real damage. People get killed by these things.
If you do decide to fly it by yourself, with no sort of experienced help, make sure you do it out in the middle of nowhere, with nobody around. It's not generally wise to fly by yourself, so have a friend with you, but have him seek cover. Don't have any other spectators.
And if possible, have him have a video camera to record your first flight -- crash videos are quite popular.
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com
If Bill Gates had a penny for every time Windows crashed...
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First, if you find an experienced R/C'er, don't call it REMOTE control! Call it RADIO control! Just an old sensitivity of mine. I remember as a kid that remote control was a toy car with a wire running out it's end to a box you held in your hand!

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| First, if you find an experienced R/C'er, don't call it REMOTE control! Call | it RADIO control! Just an old sensitivity of mine. I remember as a kid that | remote control was a toy car with a wire running out it's end to a box you | held in your hand!
And your point is? `Remote control' is accurate.
And not all R/C equipment uses radio. Some of the micro/indoor guys use IR (infrared) stuff -- you can't really call that radio control. Ultrasonic controllers are another possiblity, though I haven't seen that done in a while ...
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com
Profanity is the one language all programmers know best.
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Check www.modelaircraft.org and use their chartered club finder. You might be surprised!
Morris
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------070507070602010802020706 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
All my JR radio's, past and present didn't rely on any stinking numbering system. They had the audacity to actually label the output ports with real live names. Man what a concept!
David AMA40795 / KC5UH wrote:

--
Mike Gordon AMA 320990
Remember RC Pylon Racing, the ultimate thrill, when Sex and Drugs just ain't
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