Hello, I'm a beginner!

Hi there!
I'm seriously considering to spend some time with radio control airplanes. I've been really impressed with what I've seen in Motors
cable tv-channel, it's amazing. My question is: what's the best way to start? How much money will it cost? Thanks in advance,
Cirruz
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This is a US based site run by Tower Hobbies and it has some good info. http://www.easyrc.com /
A "ready to fly" trainer (examples; Tower Trainer 40 RTF, Superstar Select, Avistar Select) package that includes plane, engine, radio is a good starting point. These typically only take an hour, plus charging batteries overnight, to get ready after you take them out of the box.
The RTF (ready to fly) trainers sold by Tower use Futaba or Tower (rebadged Futaba) radios. http://www.towerhobbies.com/products/hobbico/index_rtf.html Listing of all Hobbico RTFs, including electric aircraft. http://www.towerhobbies.com/products/towa21.html Tower Trainer RTF
This link is to Horizon Hobby, two trainer packages they sell. These use a JR radio, http://horizon.hobbyshopnow.com/articles/1229.asp
Most of the RTF setups cost $270 to $350 in the US. In addition to the plane/engine/radio, you need glow fuel, fuel pump, glow plug ignitor, electric starter or 'chicken stick', and some basic hand tools. If you choose electric aircraft rather than glow fuel powered ones, the additional equipment needed will be different.
Many of the planes linked from the web sites above have the manuals online so you can see what's involved in the assembly and exactly what additional equipment is needed.
If there is a flying field or club in your area, you should visit it and find out what trainers and radios are popular there. If you will have an instructor, this is highly recommended, be sure what you choose is compatible with his/her equipment. Once you decide what you want, check local and mail order pricing. You might even find a good used setup for a decent price. Knowing the price of new stuff will help prevent overpaying for used stuff.
Carrell
Hi there!
I'm seriously considering to spend some time with radio control airplanes. I've been really impressed with what I've seen in Motors cable tv-channel, it's amazing. My question is: what's the best way to start? How much money will it cost? Thanks in advance,
Cirruz
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Thank you, Sir! I see there's a lot of companionship in this hobby!
Cirruz

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You got that right. If i wanted to spend lots of cash on something and not share it, id collect stamps.
Poster: I just made the jump from rc cars a few months ago, and i have something you should consider... Advice on this group was evenly divided between getting a glow-engined trainer such as a Hobbico Avistar, and getting an inexpensive electric - the GWS SlowStick was enthusiastically recommended.
Not having any idea if i could fly or not, i opted for the cheaper Slowstick (about $160usd, slightly more if you need a charger) Well, turns out i cant fly very well (yet) but the SS doesnt seem to care. I crash more than i fly....maybe 15 crashes, three Very hard, three into a tree. Broken 7 propellers @ $3 ea. No other damage. (!)
I will eventually get a glow plane - when i start crashing less - but for now this baby is my world. I love it. Cons (to be fair) 1. it HATES wind. anything over 5mph and i cant fly it....though i cant fly well in still air either. 2. there are no "middle" batteries. You either get 6 or 7 minutes with a cheap nicad or nimh battery or spend a pile on a sweeet Lithium Polymer battery and charger (flight times in excess of 30min) 3. replacement parts are not always easy to get. Horizon carries most of them though. 4. It is in fact Slow. 6 or 7 mph maybe - faster in dives. Personally, its as fast as i can deal with now. My pulse races and i sweat more than when i go to church. Im a long way off before i consider this plane boring.
PS i had a good experience with an ebay seller named Tlrascal. i emailed him what i wanted and he hooked me up. contact me off the NG if you want more info.
Fellow Newbie, MikeF

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Mike, Check out http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid 421&highlight=prop+saver and stop bustin' so many props. I haven't broken a prop since i did this.
Paul
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Yeah, i just tried that today actually. I guess the trick is to have tight enough rubber bands....my prop got a bit wobbly at WOT. On the plus side, i crashed 5 times and didnt break a single prop.

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid 421&highlight=prop+saver

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You are going to have a few crashs.
Keep trying....
my 2 cents

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid 421&highlight=prop+saver

this.
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On 12/29/2003 8:59 PM Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:
Welcome to the group (or insanity, addiction, etc. {:-) ). A 40 size glo trainer (RTF - Ready To Fly) will run about $275 - $350 plus associated peripheral equipment such as fuel, starting battery, chicken stick. Bottom line will be about $325 - $425. I will offer a couple of suggestions for glow providing the budget allows it.
    1. Instead of a RTF, get the separate components and assemble              it yourself. Yes, it will cost a little more, but you will      not outgrow it quickly and have to go buy more stuff.
    2. Get a 46 Ball Bearing engine. OS 46 FX and the Thunder              Tiger PRO 46 (make sure it is the PRO) are both excellent              engines that you will be able to use on other planes.
    3. Get a 6 channel COMPUTER radio (such as the Futaba 6XAS [not      the 6EXA] or the equivalent Airtronics or JR). Get the              brand that is most used at your flying field. You will soon      "grow into" the 6 channel radio and love the extra features.
    4. If you decide this is not for you, the equipment will be              easier to sell.
    5. Doing it "piecemeal" will add about $75 - $125 to your cost.
I fly primarily glow planes, but do some electrics also. The down side to MANY (not all) electrics are: Difficulty handling wind much over 5 mph ; unless you go with LiPO batteries you flying time will USUALLY be under 10 minutes - maybe 15 with throttle management; MANY electric planes (especially trainers) are 3 channel (no ailerons).
If you decide to go electric, I would suggest something in the speed 400 class of plane, get at least 1 extra battery pack to go with it. I would recommend a 4 channel radio also.
2 things you should not compromise on with electrics: The battery charger - a poor charger will not usually give a FULL charge and may actually hurt your battery in the long run. The other is the transmitter/receiver - get FM. The AM radios that are sold with many electrics will work, but AM is subject to a great deal of outside interference (garage door openers, CB radios, a lot of power equipment, ect.)
Your cost should be in the same general area as a glow plane + peripherals by the time all your peripherals are figured in.
For more information on electrics go to http://www.ezonemag.com /
Hope this is some help to you.

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I, too am a beginner, and I am HOOKED!
I have opted for what I think is the REALLY EASY & inexpensive path - electric Firebird planes.
1st bought a Firebird Aerobird Challenger, and had really good first flight (including doing a beautifil loop! BOY - this is easy... or so I thought. Proceeded to crash the Challenger hard - several times. 1st flight was definitely beginners luck. It is more difficult as it has 3 channels (throttle, left/right, and up/down. I think it was the up/down control that killed me!).
Went straight back to hobby shop & bought 2 more planes: a Firebird 2-ST (about $90 US, about a 30" wingspan), and a Firebird Commander ($110 US, about a 40" wingspan). Both are only 2 channel controls (throttle (which when pegged out makes it climb), and left/right). Both are GREAT!
Both are electric... fairly inexpensive... and VERY EASY to fly. I have already purchased 5 or 6 spare batteries so I can fly for over an hour (ea battery lasts about 16 - 18 minutes). Can charge batteries from cig lighter in the truck
Maybe I'll get into the more advanced gas models at some point, but for now, these little electrics are just what I was after.
bugman

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