cant stop superstar ground looping

Dan_Thomas snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Dan Thomas) wrote in message > climb

Taildraggers are inherently unstable on the ground and are a lousy

Although it is entirely possible to make a taildragger handle nicely, that does not change the fact that the design is inherently unstable
Since when?????? Dont blame the taildragger.......blame the operator. All my models are taildraggers and i love em. Never had a problem taxing or ROging. My simple advice for this: PRACTICE!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan_Thomas snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Dan Thomas) wrote in message > climb

Since When??????? Do not blame the taildragger.........but blame the operator operating the taildragger. All my models are taildraggers and I have no problems with them. So take some simple advice: PRACTICE!!!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Taildragging just make learning to fly models a bit harder. My son started out with a trike, and then converted it to a taildragger whan he got proficient with it. Now that's all he builds. Trikes have been around just about as long as taildraggers. The first airplane ever to fly in Canada was a trike, in 1909. Taildraggers were so popular for many years because of the rough airfields available to pilots; many nosegear airplanes don't do so well on such surfaces. Now we have stronger, better-designed nosewheels that can take more abuse and are resistant to noseover. But I still prefer to fly taildraggers in my work and play. I'm a flight instructor and aircraft mechanic; our students learn better in taildraggers than trikes, but then flying full-scale for the first time is easier than RCing for the first time, especially considering the extensive ground training that takes place first. And things happen more slowly.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan_Thomas snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Dan Thomas) wrote in message > BB

I started with taildraggers and tried out one trike.....but I find landing the trike in grass sucks. The front wheel will bite in the grass and a nice landing turns into a backflip.....on a hard surface its fine. My taildraggers I can ROG from grass with ease and land. As for my trike......it has floats now and makes a nice little "pond jumper"
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@netzero.net (Mike R.) wrote in message

We teach a technique in full-scale called "soft/rough" takeoffs and landings. I taught it to my son when he flew his RC trike, and he had no more grass drag problems. On takeoff, full up-elevator is applied as the throttle is opened. The nosewheel will come up if the airplane is set up properly, and the pilot adjusts the elevator to keep the nosewheel just off the surface as speed builds. This will require less and less elevator input. The airplane will fly off when it's ready, without further nose-up (or "rotation," as we call it) and climbout is normal. In some cases the airplane can lift off at very low speed, and after liftoff the airplane is held very low to the ground in ground effect to build speed for the climb. If the airplane has flaps, 10 or 20 degrees will aid greatly. A soft-field landing involves a low approach speed and a nose-high touchdown using some power, After touchdown, the nose is held off with the elevator while power is reduced gradually. The risk of noseover goes way down using these techniques, and you'll be surprised how short your airplane can take off using them. As I've said before, some private-pilot groundschool would make better RC pilots. There's a whole world of information out there, and it would be a great way to spend a few winter evenings. The applicable subjects would be Principles of Flight, Weight and Balance, a bit of Weather, and Maneuvers such as climbs, descents, turns, stalls, spins and the rest of it. You wouldn't need Air Law, Navigation or the rest of it. You can fly the airplane, but do you know WHY it behaves as it does sometimes? And how to avoid doing that again? Problem is to find a school that doesn't charge so much.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26 May 2004 07:21:10 -0700, Dan_Thomas snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Dan Thomas) wrote:

For the price of an hour of rider-scale classroom time, one could take SWMBO out for dinner and have enough left to snag a copy of "Stick And Rudder".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Take a trike and a taildragger and put them side by side....take away there nose gear and tailwheel and leave the main gear, what do you have???? A seesaw with the main gear acting as the fulcrum. So setup is very important to both. Anyway, ground handling is important but whats more important is the planes handling in the air. And that nose gear = drag compared to the little tailwheel.
Mike If you have retracts.....its a different story ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan_Thomas snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Although unstable on the ground, taildraggers are great fun and eminently controllable with practice. I trained on glow taildraggers (modified Tucano OS52 4-stroke?) and have only had 3 tricycle u/c planes (H/W Trainer and 2 lge Tucanos w 90 2-stroke) compared to 7+ 'draggers (H/W trainer, 4 mid-wing sports (46 2-strokes), 3 R.O.G'ing electric parkflyers: GWS Beaver, Kyosho Spree Sport, Wingdragon. Tricycle u/c is like driving a car - 'dragger is like flying a Spitfire (watch that swing!). You need a little toe-in for stability. A steerable tailwheel (attached to rudder) is nice but not always needed. Start with a little right rudder and up elevator (to avoid nose-over) as you overcome grass resistance. Throttle up gradually to minimise torque/swing effects. Let elevator go neutral as you build speed. Small timely corrections with rudder are important - so relax those thumbs. Big late overcorrections make ground loops. The plane may lift off with neutral elevator... otherwise apply gentle up. It's also very important to take off and land into the wind.
http://www.pipercubforum.com/topcub.htm -the pros and cons
"And then there is the dreaded TAILWHEEL! Can it be mastered? Will the airplane willfully ground loop the instant it is untied? Can only super-beings fly airplanes so equipped? What a crock! We forget that the nosedragger, taildragger controversy didn't even exist until the 152/172/Tri-Pacers became prevalent enough as trainers that a generation of pilots was born with dead feet. Every pilot before them just took the taildragger for granted. That's the way airplanes were, so that's the way they flew them. Today, there are enough tailwheel schools and instructors that getting training isn't that difficult. Depending on the individual, figure about six hours average to transition with another couple of hours of post-solo dual spent working in nasty crosswinds as insurance. There is no magic to the tailwheel. All it requires is some of the basic skills you were supposed to develop in the first place and, once you've become comfortable with the tailwheel, you'll discover an entire new world open to you." from http://www.airbum.com/articles/Article.BuyClassic.html
--
Mark Lee

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

Toe-in will add instability in most taildraggers. As the swing begins, the weight will shift toward the outside wheel, and if it's toed inward the turn will tighten and increase the rate of swing. Toeing the wheels out a bit can help reduce the instability, but the best practice is no misalignment at all. I used to fly a Champ that had a misaligned left main. It was turned in a bit, and the net result was some overall toe-in. I had to touch down with the nose cocked left about three degrees to get the line of travel symmetrically between the wheel tracklines so it wouldn't leap to the right on touchdown and try to go squirreling off the pavement. Even then I had to pay special attention to prevent ANY swing. Grass was easier. Other Champs and Citabrias I have flown had their wheels properly aligned and didn't have the bad behavior. The wheel alignment on the old Champ oleo gear required bending the strut to straighten the wheel so it often was left alone and tolerated. The newer machines have spring gear and shims to adjust alignment. Misaligned gear on the big Cessna taildraggers can be exciting indeed. Models usually just require bending some wire, but the slop in the bearings and the easily-twisted wire can make the wheels do their own thing anyway during ground ops.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've had two planes with this problem. One was a cub and I solved the problem by setting up a "dual rate" rudder with very little throw. The other was a three channel top flite elder. The rudder on this plane is so small that it has not authority at slow speeds. I doubled the size of the rudder and it did fine. It had problems landing because of the small rudder once the plane slowed down to landing speeds the rudder was useless. Again this was solved with the larger rudder.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.