First Plane

Hi, im looking for an electric RTF plane and wanted to see what you guys would suggest, my price limit is around 250 bucks US, I can go a little higher if need be but would like to keep it under 200 if possible.

Reply to
Scotty
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Well, its not really an RTF, but the GWS slow-stick is a good firs

plane, i still have it and love to dog-fight with it and fly REALL low, and the best part.....35 bucks for plane and engine....now, i looks like crap, but if built right, you can do a lot of fun thing with it :

-- Branj

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Reply to
Branjo

You can get an EasyStar Kit, with all radios, engine, and batteries, for around $200, including tax and shipping. It's a GREAT plane to learn with, because when you crash it (you will) and it's wings break or the nose comes off, you can glue it back together, practically as good as new, with superglue. Since it's a pusher, the engine and prop won't be damaged by a hard impact. You can buy extra wings, elevator/rudder, or fuselage if you damage the thing too badly.

I got one a couple of weeks ago, and have been flying it nearly every day since then. It's addictive, particularly if you live near a place with thermals.

After your first few flights, you'll want to obtain a few extra battery packs. I bought some nimh batteries from some internet site, and built 3

1700mAH packs for something like $30, including connectors (which came from Radio Shack.) The charger that comes with the EasyStar works well with nimh packs.
Reply to
Bob Monsen

Apparently the planes need a pcmcia slot so you can stick an 802.11 card in there and fly your plane with a laptop (and a dual analog controller?)

No fair scripting your stunts.

Reply to
Steve Banks

oops, this was meant for the gadget poll thread...

Reply to
Steve Banks

Well Scotty, the folks here should ask a few more questions before firing off any particular recommendations:

1) Are you planning on flying your plane at an R/C club field, or will you mostly be flying at parks or athletic fields?

2) Do you want to do take-offs from the ground? If so, will you most likely be taking off from grass or pavement?

3) Would you prefer a full-sized electric trainer capable of performing aerobatic manuvers, or are you more interested in a leisurely slow flyer?

4) Do you have any interest in flying indoors such as in a gymnasium, or will you primarily be flying only outdoors?

If you can fill in some of these blanks, we can make an educated recommendation for you.

Reply to
Ed Paasch

Just parks and fields around my house.

Yes I would like to but can buy a hand launch plane for my first one if need be. Probably pavement.

Acrobatic maneuvers would be more fun for me.

Only outdoors.

So far I was looking at

F-27 Stryker

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Aerobird Xtreme
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for my first plane, not sure if these would be a good choice or not, I think they are both hand launced planes as well which I would not like as much as taking off from land but would still be just as much fun to fly.

I also appreciate the questions and help in finding a plane that is right for me.

Reply to
Scotty

I don't know about a front prop plane, if I landed wrong i could ruin the prop and motor right?

Reply to
Scotty

That, my friend, is the least of your worries :-)

Anyway GWS gearbox shafts and props are not expensive..

Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

So you think GWS is the way to go too?

Is the GWS a good acrobatic plane? Like loops and rolls? If it is just a slow flying plane I don't think I would have much fun with it. Anyone know how fast it is? The F-27 STryker I was looking at does 55MPH out of the box if I'm not mistaken. That would be a fast plane with a brushless :-).

I liked the Aerobird Xtreme because it has a safe mode to learn on and then a pro mode to switch to after I learn how to fly.

I wasn't sure about the GWS because my LHS doesnt sell it, I would have to order it. Any idea what a GWS Slowstick costs? The other two planes I mentioned sell for about 180 at the LHS.

Reply to
Scotty

"Scotty" wrote :>

Scotty, I have the F-27 Stryker, it was my first and only plane. It is a bit tricky to learn on as it is very fast and it has to be flown all the time. However it can take a lot of abuse and is easy to repair.

I practiced flying it on a simulator first, that helped a lot. I used FMS and a model of the F-27, both are free and can be downloaded from the net. I used a game-pad with the sim.

I did crash a bit in the beginning, but have managed to repair everything without need for new parts except a couple of propellers.

The Stryker is an awsome plane, loops and rolls quite well. Inverted flight is easy and it can even do an inverted "harrier", hoover upside down.

A colleague also has a Stryker and we both have the sonic combat modules, we have dog-fights in our lunch break. A couple of times we have crashed mid-air. It is great fun, and the damage has allways been repairable with some tape and glue.

Now I fly on 10-cell packs for extra power and stability, speed is way above 60 mph and rolls are much smoother with the extra weight.

If you decide to get it, make sure you have plenty of space on your first flights and try to bring it gently up to high altitudes before trying to turn around. It glides very well and in the beginning you will need lots of space for landing as it tends to glide further than you think. If you get in trouble, allways cut the engine as the damage will be less severe without a running engine.

Check the parkflyers forum on

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for tons of advise on the Stryker.

Most will say it is not a beginners plane, but it was for me and I'm very happy with it.

Good luck!

-- Helge

Reply to
Helge Opgård

Thank you, now if I can just hear from someone who has flown the aerobird ;p, the LHS plane guy said you could learn with a stryker but it was a steep learning curve. I'll either learn the first day or be back the next day buying a new body lol

Reply to
Scotty

Meant to ask, the Styker is very light right? How well does it do in wind? How much wind can it be flown in?

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Reply to
Scotty

The EasyStar has a nice solution, which is that the motor is mounted behind the wings, on top. It's nearly impossible to ding the motor.

However, the OP wants aerobatic, so the EasyStar is pretty much out. You can do loops with a bit of altitude, but rolls are anemic. Lazy 8s and hammerheads are also doable, but a snap roll? Many of these aerobatic manuvers require ailerons. (There is an aileron mod for the EasyStar... ;)

I saw some guys doing dynamic soaring yesterday at the berkeley marina. Yow! Aerobatic? Zoom! These guys were soaring hand launch glider foamies, and getting them up to at least 60 mph by zooming in circles. They use a null behind a hill, flying alternately into the wind, then into the null, to pump energy into the thing. Very fast, very cool. Not for the faint of heart.

Reply to
Bob Monsen

| However, the OP wants aerobatic, so the EasyStar is pretty much out. You | can do loops with a bit of altitude, but rolls are anemic. Lazy 8s and | hammerheads are also doable, but a snap roll? Many of these aerobatic | manuvers require ailerons. (There is an aileron mod for the EasyStar... ;)

You can do a lot of aerobatics with just rudder/elevator/throttle if you have enough power. The Aerobird Extreme is remarkably maneuverable for being one of the lower end `toys', for example.

| I saw some guys doing dynamic soaring yesterday at the berkeley marina. | Yow! Aerobatic? Zoom! These guys were soaring hand launch glider | foamies, and getting them up to at least 60 mph by zooming in circles. | They use a null behind a hill, flying alternately into the wind, then | into the null, to pump energy into the thing. Very fast, very cool. Not | for the faint of heart.

Dynamic soaring speed records are over 200 mph! (Granted, those sorts of speeds are not normally attained by the foamies ...)

I've tried to DS myself, but never quite had it down more than a loop or two.

Reply to
Doug McLaren

I don't think its possible to hurt the prop on an aerobird unless you came in upside down and tail first.

Reply to
Scotty

Fling combo: Everything you need for $175, absolutely perfect for the park, sure it flies nice, comes with a high start or throw it by hand:

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** , though it looks like you have to glue the wing halves together and put the servos/linkages/radio in.

The futaba SS3 radio it comes with is very light and comfortable/ergonomic, and FM 72MHZ so you can upgrade to a fancier transmitter when you are ready for it (and have some idea of what you want) and it can be compatable with this receiver. It also has an elevon/v-tail mix switch for flying wings (slinger,zagi).

They have an aileron dlg version for like $100, buy the radio and glue seperately, receiver has to be micro sized I'm sure. This plane has a 1 rudder servo and 2 aileron servos and 1 elevator servo so it can make use of more radio than the SS3, but as with any aileron plane it could be flown on ailerons and elevator alone. And a $12 onboard elevon mixer can be used for spoileron/flapperon function on the throttle channel if your transmitter isn't up to that task.

The aerobird is overpriced, oversized for the average park, overweight, overugly, and overretarded (cant use the radio equipment with much else). I'm learning that even a speed 400 can be a bit much for good neighborliness, especially direct drive. That pretty much leaves crappy flying and looking red baron planes, or much more graceful, maneuverable, and challenging hand launch or mini mini high start gliders.

Reply to
Steve Banks

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