first plane suggestions, gas, no RTF or ARF

I am sure the 'first plane' questions gets asked a lot here. I see one other post currently asking this, but looking for something different
than I am.
I am looking to buy a beginners plane. I want a balsa kit, as to me, building it will be half the fun (even if I crash it, and have to rebuild it...). The other stipulation is a gas motor.
If it makes a difference, I would be interested in mounting a camera on it, at some time in the future.
So if anyone has suggestions for a balsa kit, that works with a gas motor, that would be great.
Thanks,
~S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I forgot to mention that I am currently leaning towards the Great Planes PT-40 MKII Trainer. http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXJ557&P=0
Thanks,
~S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The PT-40 is a fine airplane and I am sure you will enjoy it very much. Since you are looking at the PT-40 may I suggest the PT-60 instead ? The instructions have two settings for the dihedral, "normal" and "sport", build it with a little less dihedral than the "sport" setting. I am not sure if the PT-40 has this option in the instructions or not. If you can transport the larger plane I am sure you will be very pleased with it and I know from personal experience that the PT-60 is a great flying and extremely strong plane. The plane is very capable of carrying a camera. It is also easy to convert the plane to be a tail dragger. A ball bearing 60 2 stroke will give you plenty of power, a 91 4 stroke would suit this plane very well if you can stand the cost.
Charlie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shea Martin wrote:

Won't get easier or more basic than that..if you must go for vibration, camera shake, oil on the lens etc etc.
There is a reason most good camera platforms are electric....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Hmmm... I never thought of that. I still want gas though, maybe my next one will be an electric with camera. Is a four stroke or gas any better than a 2-stroke glow, for vibration?
~S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shea Martin wrote:

Probly worse.
I fly electric ;-)
Nothing personal against gas, its just too much hassle and I need to go too far to find a field..Cost me double. Gas in the model,gas in the SUV...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've helped a few folks with PT40's and PT60's and to put it mildly I'm not a big fan. They're doggie flyers with far too much dihedral, real pilot-fighters.
IMO absolutely the best flying, best instructions, most complete you-build-it kit for a fuel-powered trainer is the Sig Kadet LT-40. It's big, easy to see, and it flies slowly - very slowly if you like - which is the most important attribute of a trainer. A decent .40 is plenty of power, too, even though it's pretty big. I've helped lotta folks with a lotta different models and the LT-40 is my all-time favorite. I've literally forced spectators to fly mine and they've done so without mishap.
Texas Pete
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well said Pete,
I'll second the comments about the PT series being a PITA. I have yet to see one that flies really well.
The Midwest Aerostar is high on my list of good flying planes
The ONLY real problems with the Aerostar are that they actually fly TOO easily, and don't force you to learn the rudder like you should, and they need some tri-stock braces on the vertical and horizontal stabs to be "beginner tough"
the Sig LT-40 or even the LT-25 would be good.
The Telemasters are also good. I have a Senior Tele with a .91 four stroke on it, and the electric tele. they fly almost identically the same in spite of the huge difference in size.
YMMV bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm going to second (or third) that. If you really like building and have a lot of room, then a Kadet or a Kadet Seniorita are my first choice. They take a lot of building (nothing tricky, just a lot of building) and just sort of putter around the sky very nicely. I've flown several of them and they're my favorite trainer. The LT-40 is quite a bit easier to build, though, probably a bit more rugged, and also a very good trainer, so it would be my first recommendation.
--
"Show up naked, bring beer - men are so easy to please."
- Kacey Jones
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Texas Pete wrote:

How does the SIG Kadet Mark II compare to the LT-40 or LT-25?
Thanks,
~S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Keep in mind that my only direct experience here is with the LT-40.
The Mk II is the smallest of the three and an older-engineered kit, so it's probably fussier to build than the other two, and it's also got the highest wing loading so it's probably gotta be flown a little faster. I've not flown one, though, so I really can't address the flight performance.
Have a look at the specs for yourself:
LT-40 -
http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmart.exe/ProductsV4.html?L+Sig+qkmq3354+_Ddp_5fSearch1_02A_2dPlaneRCKadetLt40_01Search_02Index_01
LT-25 -
http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmart.exe/ProductsV4.html?L+Sig+qkmq3354+_Ddp_5fSearch1_02A_2dPlaneRCKadetLt25_01Search_02Index_01
Mk II
http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmart.exe/ProductsV4.html?L+Sig+qkmq3354+_Ddp_5fSearch1_02A_2dPlaneRCKadetMII_01Search_02Index_01
Depending on how your newsreader functions you may have to copy these into your browser, and they may be split into more than one line so be sure to copy and paste both lines correctly.
By the specs the LT-25 should be as good a flier as the LT-40, but the larger size, more complete kit, and tricycle landing gear of the LT-40 would make it my choice as a first plane recommendation. My advice is to stop pondering and get an LT-40.
As per Bob's remarks re - the Aerostar, the vertical fin on the LT-40 could benefit from some tri-stock braces or dowelling (a couple or three toothpicks would do) to the horizontal stab. If you can you should get an experienced modeller to help you, but if that's not possible the LT-40 is literally a model building course in a box.
Texas Pete
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Texas Pete wrote:

http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmart.exe/ProductsV4.html?L+Sig+qkmq3354+_Ddp_5fSearch1_02A_2dPlaneRCKadetLt40_01Search_02Index_01
http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmart.exe/ProductsV4.html?L+Sig+qkmq3354+_Ddp_5fSearch1_02A_2dPlaneRCKadetLt25_01Search_02Index_01
http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmart.exe/ProductsV4.html?L+Sig+qkmq3354+_Ddp_5fSearch1_02A_2dPlaneRCKadetMII_01Search_02Index_01
Yeah, I think you have me convinced on the LT-40. It'll be another payday before I can buy it (without catching hell from my wife).
~S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm guessing by "gas" you mean glow fuel. There are gas engines but mostly they are for teh larger planes. As I type I'm thinking a very large trainer might be cool! I built a Carl Goldberg Falcon 56 and it taught me many things. I do not know which balsa trainer kits now days would give you all the beginner hints. What size do you think you might like? a 40 size usually takes a .35 to .46 size glow engine. There are smaller ones and larger ones. mk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My first plane was a Falcon 56 too! I learned a lot by building it, but only got a couple flights on it due to a really REALLY bad first radio in the 70's. (a Blue Max I think...)
Goldberg has released a modern version called the Falcon III. http://www.carlgoldbergproducts.com/falcon3.htm
PCPhill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My first radio was a Kraft 76 series. About $265. Do you know what that will buy now days? Much more! Good radio though. mk

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I eventually ended up with a Kraft and a Heathkit. Loved'em both. My stepfather had a Single stick ProLine. He's lucky he didn't turn his back on it...
PCPhill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Storm's Hamburgers wrote:

That's right, I am a real newb.

I am not really an aviation buff, so I don't really need anything to scale, thus I was thinking more in absolute sizes, say 60"~70".
My guess is that a smaller plane may be trickier to fly?
~S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here's a very nice model to start with...... http://www.hobby-lobby.com/tel40gas.htm
A larger version if you wish...... http://www.hobby-lobby.com/srtele.htm
--
--
Preston S Justis
Astrophotography home page:
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm sticking with my LT-40 or Kadet recommendation from my other post, but the Telemasters are also very good.
--
"Show up naked, bring beer - men are so easy to please."
- Kacey Jones
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Gee, how to answer this question without sounding too negative....
I'd recommend buying your standard ARF trainer. They are relatively cheap and have no "emotional investment" when compared to building your own plane.
Given my observations, less than 50% of trainers last from first lesson through to solo rating. Some pilots will need half a dozen before they get the hang of flying. That's a lot of wasted effort and disappointment if you built them all yourself.
As for gas engines, do you mean a glow engine or a gasoline/petrol fueled engine? Go for glow engine to start with as you're unlikely to find a trainer friendly sized gasoline engine.
Camera and all that stuff is great fun but don't expect too much from your first plane by leaping into a larger, camera equipped, gasoline aircraft.
PS. Just saw your other post with the link. Although I'm not familar with that particular model it looks like an excellent trainer to begin with.
--
The Raven
http://www.80scartoons.co.uk/batfinkquote.mp3
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

  • - the site's newest thread. Posted in

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.