K & B Resin ??

Home Depot, Lowes, Ace Hardware, etc. etc. etc. It's just a water based polyurethane clear finish.
Reply to
jeboba
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DON'T use acetone to thin epoxy, use denatured alcohol!
Reply to
jeboba
OK! But why? Not that I ever have. But I can see where, to the uninformed, acetone might be seen as a natural substitute for the alcohol.
Reply to
C.O.Jones
Acetone leaves a residue. Try using it to clean the monokote on your model. Acetone also evaporates too quickly. Alcohol is THE prescribed thinner for epoxy.
Reply to
jeboba
I tried the polyurethane yesterday on a smaller area, it doesn't seem to fill the weave very well. Have you had any problems with this? When you paint does the fiberglass show through. Brad
Reply to
Brad
You are only using the polyurethane to adhere the cloth. You can do a second coat to help fill the weave. When that is completely dry, sand and primer. Use a primer/filler, not a primer/sealer. The primer is what will fill the weave. Sand down the primer before color coating. You can use about any spray can primer. I use the Duco auto paint stuff from the local auto parts store. I use latex paint for color coats. You can put a final gloss coat of clear polyurethane on it if you want it a bit shinier.
Reply to
jeboba
Okay thanks a bunch for the information, I put two coats on today and lightly sanded. Tomorrow I plan to put the primmer on and prep for painting. With two coats and no primmer it is already starting to smooth out. The primmer should finish the job nicely. I do not have a air gun yet so I plan to just use Lustercote paint for the time being. Before I start the P-39 I will purchase a gun, and master this fiberglassing stuff. Thanks Again, Brad Darnell
Reply to
Brad
Please, sir ... In your infinite wisdom, could you explain why one should use alcohol rather than acetone for thinning epoxy?
I have used both, and I much prefer using acetone. (Actually, I use lacquer thinner which is mostly acetone.) I find that due to the faster evaporation and lack of water retention, it does a better job.
What reason do you have for choosing alcohol?
Jim - AMA 501383
jeboba wrote:
Reply to
James D Jones
Please, sir ... In your infinite wisdom, could you explain why one should use alcohol rather than acetone for thinning epoxy?
I have used both, and I much prefer using acetone. (Actually, I use lacquer thinner which is mostly acetone.) I find that due to the faster evaporation and lack of water retention, it does a better job.
What reason do you have for choosing alcohol?
Jim - AMA 501383
jeboba wrote:
I agree,there are also a lot more uses for the acetone than the alcohol. DOUG - AMA 21449
Reply to
Courseyauto
An interesting question. I had always heard that denatured alcohol was the preferred thinner. Did a quick search and skimmed through an article I found which suggests that acetone, denatured alcohol or laquer thinner are all ok. The only downside I read about acetone is it will tend to cause the epoxy to turn darker. Here's the article I read:
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Please, sir ... In your infinite wisdom, could you explain why
Reply to
C G
Back in the 60s and early 70s, I used acetone. However, when I found out that I could use almost any alcohol, I switched for 2 reasons: 1) The alcohol dries more slowly, allowing more time to soak in. You could use Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK), but it is a carcinogen. 2) It is not as explosive. Denatured alcohol has (I think) a flash point of about 50 deg. F or so. Acetone is well below zero.
It's also cheap. Surprisingly, you can use almost any alcohol. I don't use rubbing alcohlo (30% water) because it takes the epoxy about a week to harden fully in the summer, but 91% is good if you want it to soak in.
Reply to
Mike Norton

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