New Subscriber - Need new elec aircraft

Hi, New subscriber and novice in this field. I had a gift from my children about 6 years ago of a Wingo aircraft and electronic package
recommended by Hobby Lobby. After the 6th or 7th flight, on a breezy evening, I skillfully flew it into the side of the local school. The aircraft was destroyed. I just tested the electronics and batteries and they checked out good. I want to get back to learning and would welcome some input on a new aircraft that would take the electronics that I have. Wingos appear to be unavailable now but I don't want one anyway. The package included a 6 v Speed 400 C with a 125x110 prop, Jeti 6-10 NC JES 110 ESC, 7 cell NiCd (1.2v 600mAh), Hitec RCD Micro 555 RCD 8500, 2 Hitec HS-81 servos, and a Laser 4 Transmitter (up/down and left/right throttle combined). I was not happy with the aircraft performance. If I did the math correctly, it had a Static Thrust/AUW of 30%. It would just barely make it up off the tarmac (forget if off the grass) and it had to be hand launched. I don't know a heck of a lot about it (but learning) and would appreciate a recommendation on an aircraft and some minimal improvements I might make to my set-up to make the replacement aircraft fly better than the Wingo did. Thank you for any help. Byron Lane
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On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 19:36:09 -0500, Byron Lane wrote:

Progress has marched, and your power system is getting pretty long in the tooth. You may find it's less expensive to scrap it and start over -- but that needs to be your decision.
The biggest improvement that you can make, and the one that makes those speed 400 motors come alive, is to use a gearbox and a bigger prop. Direct drive brushed motors, unless they're in something tiny and fast, are just sick things.
By the time you do anything real you'll find that your battery pack has bit the dust -- six years of use OR sitting on the shelf will do one of those in, so you're due for new. Lithium Polymer batteries are way cool from a weight/capacity standpoint, but you'd need to buy a charger which isn't cheap. A geared speed 400 with a nicad pack and the right plane is still a nice combo, although _very_ dated.
I'd look around for a high-wing 3-channel ARF that weighs around 12-16 ounces and has around a 40-45 inch wingspan. With that motor, geared, and the right prop you should be fine.
If you go into a hobby shop they'll try to sell you a brushless outrunner motor and LiPo batteries. This is definitely a higher performance combination, and not too much more expensive if you're starting from nothing -- but you'll need new motor, ESC, batteries, and charger. That set of kit is about 1/2 the cost of a new airplane (thank goodness your radio is still good, eh?). If you have the $$ though, it's worth it.
If you're cost-constrained, then just get a gearbox for the motor (or a geared motor) an 8-4 or 8-6 (200-100 or 200-150) prop, and a 7-cell NiCd flight pack. That'll run you a lot less than the new cool stuff, and it'll fly just fine.
--
www.wescottdesign.com

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On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 19:36:09 -0500, Byron Lane wrote:

And get on the AMA web site (www.modelaircraft.org) and see if there's any R/C clubs near you. If the first one gives you the cold shoulder try the next one on the list -- some clubs are very welcoming to newbies, and having someone to give you a hand over the rough spots is exceedingly valuable when you're learning something like this.
I taught myself how to fly R/C, and the only thing that kept it from being the dumbest thing in the world was the fact that I was 15, didn't have a driver's license, and lived miles from any fields. Once I could drive out to flying fields I learned buckets just from hanging out and listening to conversations, never mind what I learned from having questions answered.
--
www.wescottdesign.com

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GWS Slow Stick. Will use your current servos and radio system. Most come with their own geared motor. One of the easiest planes to assemble, I assembled one up at Chilao Campground so I could take aerial photos of our campsite. I have had two wingos and multiple Slow Sticks and the Slow Stick is a better flier and MUCH more rugged and repairable. Everybody at my field flies one tho I think we are all flying with brushless motors. That's my recommendation.
Dan

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Thanks for the replies. I purchased a Slow Stick Park Flyer (aircraft only) which comes with a 400 C motor, gearbox, and 7x3.5 propeller. I would like to ask one more question. When calculating Power Loading, for a given Wattage battery pack, how do you account for Watt efficiencies at the propeller for various combinations of motor, with and without a gearbox, and various propeller pitches? Thank you. Byron Lane
On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 19:36:09 -0500, Byron Lane

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On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 13:00:01 -0500, Byron Lane wrote: (top posting fixed)

I'm not sure what you think you need to do -- normally one determines the motor/prop combination one wants. That in turn sets the voltage and current requirements on the pack. Voltage and current set the power output ('wattage'), but you buy the battery pack by voltage, current, and capacity, not really by power output.
Check the kit -- it should say what battery you need, or (better) what voltage and current you want to run with. Basically you need to supply the right voltage at the right current for six minutes or more (this is where a LiPo battery is cool -- it supplies about the same current/weight as a NiMH, but for lots longer).
--
www.wescottdesign.com

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