PC router/Trannie problem (UK)

Hi (from the UK)
I have just spent several hours trying to figure out a strange computer problem. My home network consists of a desktop PC with a
wired connection to the router plus two laptops connected wirelessly to the network.
This morning, I was playing with my Blade CP pro2 heli in my garden and damaged my only set of rotor blades. In disgust, I put the heli and Tx back in my computer room where it normally lives.
Some time later my wife complained that her laptop would not connect to the Internet. Her PC showed an excellent connection to the router and everything appeared normal, but there was no connection to the WWW (or her emails). Having spent some time failing to solve the problem, I discovered that my own (wireless) laptop showed the same symptoms but that the (wired) desktop was fine, indicating a probable problem with the router wireless signal.
I decided to switch everything off and reboot the router and laptops. No change. I was just about to re-install the router settings - and had even started thinking about a new router - when I noticed that I had forgotten to switch off the Blade (2.4 gHz spektrum) Tx, which I had placed on the shelf a few inches from the router. I switched off the Heli Tx, tried the laptops and everything worked fine.
It would appear that, whilst my trusty 35mhz Tx is OK, the 2.4 spektrum Tx affects the router signal.
The moral of the story is - if your computer is giving problems, one more thing to check is that your RC trannies are switched off!!!!!!
Regards KGB
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Good to know. The batteries would have died and you may have never figured it out. mk
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On Wed, 08 Jul 2009 15:30:10 GMT, "KGB"

Did your router have the frequency flag? -- Ray
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KGB...that is quite a find. I hope you additionally post your findings on RC Universe and RC Groups and any other RC group that you know of. It may explain some of the crashes and other "bothers" that have come up with 2.4.
I know that our club secretary who goes on-line wirelessly to update our club membership lists etc.. He does this while others are flying. I just wonder if his use of the computer might, somehow, interfere with guys flying??? thanks for posting. Rich
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ONLY if it is a wireless LAN. If he is using a wireless service (a la Verizon or whomever) the frequency bands are different.
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Doubtful.
Wireless networks do not frequency hop. The RC units hop around and only pick frequencies that are not busy, so would avoid the channels being used by the network. The closeness is the only thing that caused problems.
--
Jim in NC


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What makes me wonder in KGB's report is that the two laptops made a good connection to the router, but could not connect to the web. In other words, the wireless part was functioning OK. So was it so that his heli TX was also connecting to the net, and using all the bandwith, not leaving anything for the PC.
Yikes, maybe all these GHz TX's are using the wireless routers to connect to the internet, talking to each other, planning a revolution?
-Tapio-
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On Wed, 08 Jul 2009 15:30:10 GMT, "KGB"

B and G mode routers output is typically around to 30 to 40 mW just like your transmitter. N level ones usually go to about 100mW
Your Tx is also outputting around 100mW
The TX works on 2.400GHz - 2.4835GHz range which is exactly the same as the router uses (and also some home cordless phone, bluetooth, video transmitters) You'll probably finding the TX was swamping the router out it will get a signal received but the tranny will be swamping it so much data will be either unutterable or so garbled it will be useless..
The moral is don't be in a rush to move to a frequency band shared between who knows what else equipment around you, when there is a perfectly good 35Mhz band that's exclusively air use only.....
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FWIW I have found that a number of 2.4GHz devices such as TV extenders, cordless phones, remote door transmitters etc will compromise a WiFi LAN. It's not that the connection is lost just that the collision levels are so high that DHCP can't deliver the DNS routing information thus stopping communication.
Seabee (UK)
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