R/C Hand drill ?

Hello,
I am wondering if any of you have ever seen a R/C hand drill. The idea
is to use small servos that would push the trigger of a hand drill as
well as make it go back and forth. Has anybody ever seen something like
this on the web. Either it has never been done and reported on the web
or I am using the wrong keywords on google.
Thanks in advance,
Jake.
Reply to
Newbie
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Reply to
kenji
IF you are limiting yourself to only hand drills, the answer is NO. By definition they were not meant to be automated.
IF you are talking about a) on/off power for a drill b) push/retract for drill pressure, these two actions are what CNC (Computer-Numerical-Controlled) drills are all about, although these are usually floor-standing machine-tools.
Also, assuming that you have a clamping setup to hold the drill, servo-controlled actuators could be attached to that mount that would interact mechanically with the drill to imitate your finger action. Furthermore, the mount itself would need to be on a slider of some kind to make it move forward.
A company called something like Stock Drive Parts ...
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has a catalog (free) of all sorts of small precision parts that would work in conjuction with the servos or actuators you would need. N.B. I strongly recommend you get their catalog before doing anything or even going thru their web site.
You are likely to find everything that you want from a supplier like FESTO who specialize in automation equipment (usually pneumatic) for doing what you want. Naturally this is industrial grade versus hobby grade, but if you are trying to build something to throw into the "Robot Wars" ring, then FESTO or someone like them is where you'll find some of what you need.
Some relevant reading on (servo-actuated drilling):
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Othe info
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Have fun,
Eric
Reply to
abracadabra
When I made my electric screwdriver r/c i found it was alot easier to take it apart and make my own switch.
Reply to
Himszy
I have taken apart one of these switches, they are not easy to understand actually. How can I actuate these switches with r/c servos is really the question.
Jake,
Reply to
Newbie
The below link shows one way to have a servo operate a switch, which could be easier than pushing a button with the servo. You can tie the button down and turn it on and off by placing two wires on opposite sides of a thin piece of cardboard, and placing this between the battery tip and the battery holder contact.
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Reply to
Si Ballenger
Umm.. it sounds like you really want a speed controller with reverse. You are mostly on your own when you get into Rube Goldberg land,
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, as it seems like that is where you are headed here ;)
Over and out.
Reply to
Steve Banks
For what use?
Reply to
AirMan
Haven't seen one but I'm sure one could be easily made using standard components.
Not sure what the point is but it sounds like you are trying to build a mini-mill or automated pedestal drill for some industrial application.
Reply to
The Raven
He's a terrorist and he wants to build a remote-controlled drill to threaten airline passengers while he hijacks the plane and crashes it into the World Trade Center...
For crying out loud, WHO CARES? He wants to run a drill with servos. Let him be creative. Maybe he'll invent something useful and revolutionary.
Reply to
mkirsch1
You don't have to use servos. There are switches available which are activated by the receiver, i.e. plug into ch5 and switch on and off with the ch5 switch on the TX. The ones that I know of wouldn't handle the current but it might be easier to use a relay than rig up a servo. CM
Reply to
cm
What frequency band would it be on?
Dr1
Reply to
Dr1
C'mon Jake. Everyones curious. Just what are you planning on doing with this R/C drill? If it is for a CNC drill application or mill type arrangement, I would recommend modifying a drill press. They're a bit more expensive than a hand drill but they already have the mechanical mounting and sliding built in. Then all you have to do (he says as if it is easy) is make a moving base for a vice. If you let us know what you are planning I'm sure you will get more ideas better suited to a solution.
Matthew
Reply to
Matthew Gunn
But we still wonder about the purpose of an RC drill!
Reply to
AirMan
Maybe it's for a battle bot?
Reply to
Justin Mahn
Could be. In which case a cordless drill is perfect. Then I would have to ask, do you really need the variable speed? So many questions all answered by knowing the purpose of the drill.
Matthew
Reply to
Matthew Gunn
Maybe he's building a new kind of remotely-controlled bomb-defusing robot. It would explain why he is being cagey.
If so, do look up the references I posted earlier.
Eric
Reply to
abracadabra
One other comment.
By refraining from "leading" our thought processes, he is deliberately using the brainstorming technique to generate ideas, possibly coming up with that most perfect of solutions from out in left field:
the elegant solution !
To that I would respond:
Let the creative juices flow !
HOWEVER, I think it is time to reduce the scope back down to only
comp.robotics.misc rec.models.rc.misc rec.models.rc.land
because this is straying far from specific RC flying.
Eric
Reply to
abracadabra
Thank you this is along the lines of what I was looking for.
Jake.
Reply to
Newbie
Ok we give up already! What the heck is it's use?
Reply to
AirMan

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