R/C Hand drill ?

Hello,
I am wondering if any of you have ever seen a R/C hand drill. The idea is to use small servos that would push the trigger of a hand drill as
well as make it go back and forth. Has anybody ever seen something like this on the web. Either it has never been done and reported on the web or I am using the wrong keywords on google.
Thanks in advance,
Jake.
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http://www.mmsonline.com/articles/069901.html
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IF you are limiting yourself to only hand drills, the answer is NO. By definition they were not meant to be automated.
IF you are talking about a) on/off power for a drill b) push/retract for drill pressure, these two actions are what CNC (Computer-Numerical-Controlled) drills are all about, although these are usually floor-standing machine-tools.
Also, assuming that you have a clamping setup to hold the drill, servo-controlled actuators could be attached to that mount that would interact mechanically with the drill to imitate your finger action. Furthermore, the mount itself would need to be on a slider of some kind to make it move forward.
A company called something like Stock Drive Parts ...
http://www.sdp-si.com /
has a catalog (free) of all sorts of small precision parts that would work in conjuction with the servos or actuators you would need. N.B. I strongly recommend you get their catalog before doing anything or even going thru their web site.
You are likely to find everything that you want from a supplier like FESTO who specialize in automation equipment (usually pneumatic) for doing what you want. Naturally this is industrial grade versus hobby grade, but if you are trying to build something to throw into the "Robot Wars" ring, then FESTO or someone like them is where you'll find some of what you need.
Some relevant reading on (servo-actuated drilling): http://www.mendonet.com/cnclinks / http://www.electroimpact.com/research/DRILLDRIVE.asp
http://www.techsavvy.com/industry/file/national/0bp4v/hmi02.html?id 1177&comp_id P4V&base_region=* http://www.manufacturingcenter.com/tooling/archives/0800/0800tp.asp
Othe info
http://pub157.ezboard.com/frobotbattlesfrm4.showMessageRange?topicID=9.topic&start !&stop@ http://www.uspto.gov/go/classification/uspc251/defs251.htm http://www.communitypc.com/links.htm
Have fun,
Eric
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When I made my electric screwdriver r/c i found it was alot easier to take it apart and make my own switch.
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I have taken apart one of these switches, they are not easy to understand actually. How can I actuate these switches with r/c servos is really the question.
Jake,
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Umm.. it sounds like you really want a speed controller with reverse. You are mostly on your own when you get into Rube Goldberg land, http://www.rubegoldberg.com/html/gallery.htm , as it seems like that is where you are headed here ;)
Over and out.

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Steve Banks wrote:

LOL. That's a classic. Mind you he probably does have a good reason. Maybe like another poster says, it might be for a robot war style bot.
Matthew
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wrote:

The below link shows one way to have a servo operate a switch, which could be easier than pushing a button with the servo. You can tie the button down and turn it on and off by placing two wires on opposite sides of a thin piece of cardboard, and placing this between the battery tip and the battery holder contact.
http://www.geocities.com/zoomkat/switch.htm
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Thank you this is along the lines of what I was looking for.
Jake.
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Ok we give up already! What the heck is it's use?

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Have fun with the rotary switch newbie. You should be made aware that for about the same amount of money and effort and 1/100 the weight you could put together a solid state switch, here are some examples (there are lots more): http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/gadgets/rc-sw.htm http://www.welwyn.demon.co.uk/rcsw/rcsw.htm
and here is a real cheap one: http://www.tuug.fi/~isaarine/electronics/rc-switch / This uses a 4001 quad NOR (<$0.40) for an oscillator and a latch. Hook up a mosfet for a few bucks and it will handle a load, and be solid state reliable.

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I am sensitive to the Rube Goldberg parallel, this is why I really like your answer. Thanks,
Jake.
Steve Banks wrote:

for
could put

more):
Hook up a

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He has told you whats it for:
Agreed for the RC flying. This is not a brainstorming technique, rather, I am trying to see why this ability to automate a relatively powerful but cheap piece of equipment has not been more used by hobbyists.
I am actually thinking of several different project, at least two of them use powerful rotating motors and do not need to run for hours.
The first one is indeed a battle bot of some kind. The second is a robot that would climb on walls or cliffs (the hand drill serves at the feet of the robot.) Both of these, I think require, a cheap way to do drilling. Since I am on the cheap, I see this hand drill solution as pretty ideal.
Jake.
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I am curious how you will achieve the rock-face drilling.
- drilling in rock (like concrete) takes a lot of pressure
- rock drilling is best achieved (not only way) when using water/air as lubricant for cooling and chip removal from the hole to prevent clogging and overheat
I am sure that you don't want to reveal what may become a trade secret (keeping a grip on the wall while drilling) but assuming that you are dealing with
- 6 legs ( 2 move forward at a time into new holes) - 2 drills for punching a set of holes at the same time (to prevent advancing at a complete crawl)
I recommend expanding pins on the legs themselves rather than drills. This way, they insert loose, then can be clamped(expanded) or released for holding or moving on.
This would allow you to invest in better equipment and drills for the 2 drills, but it would add extra weight.
If you use only drills for the hole drilling, and you leave them in the hole during a manoeuvre (move other legs), you face the danger of cooling of the rock-wall clamping on your leg drill-bit.
VERY NOVEL idea to pursue ! I love it because I can imagine many applications that I don't want to mention here.
Good Luck !
Eric
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I'm curious if he thought about the implications of trying it out in a national park ;)
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I think I figured it out !
It's an underwater mining exploration rig !
He wants to drill into the chasm walls, - where veins of readily-available minerals are exposed, and - where currents are erratic.
=> can't use a tether for wireline control from a sub that is bouncing around in the eddy currents.
Alright, I admit that it's a stretch ... but WE will never know until it shows up in Popular Science :-))
Eric
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abracadabra wrote:

See, that's what I like about Newsgroups. Just when things are getting boring, you get a great post like this one. Someone has an ever so sligtly misguided idea about using power drills as motive force for some robot thing, and another guy comes out of no where, grabs the ball and is suddenly seen sprinting off in a completely unrelated direction for the "rock face drilling" goal line. Brilliant!
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Yeah, it's kind of like the old practice that we all used to share many, many years ago. You know the one. It happened when we all stood around on a street corner and talked to one another. I think it was called conversation. 8^>
Ed Cregger
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Conversation, yes I remember.
Here is another obvious application of the r/c hand drill:
http://www.discover.com/issues/apr-05/features/whole-house-machine /
especially in the U.S. where most houses are built with wood.
Jake.
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suddenly
That was the manufacturing troubleshooter in me crawling out of the cocoon hoping that the emerging creature was beautiful.
Did you feel the urge to jump into the sub and go undersea mining ?
Eric
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