Lincoln "coffee grinder" DC stick welder

A couple of years ago I posted an inquiry about an old Lincoln 3 phase
"R2D2" welder I bought on ebay.
Specifically, I'm wondering whether anybody has ever managed to spin
one of the things from some kind of external power supply such as a
tractor PTO.
I have seen pictures of old Lincoln welders that were designed
precisely for that purpose.
I'd like to do something with this machine. Especially now since I
just got our old Farmall Cub running again.
One of the responses to my original post stated that the 3 phase motor
and the rotor share the same bearings. He went on to suggest that I
operate it with a phase converter.
But I'm much more razzed about spinning it mechanically.
Has anybody out there ever done this? Somebody said they call those
"coffee can" welders.
Thanks,
Vernon
Reply to
Vernon
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The original Lincoln pto-driven unit was called a TractaPak (sp?) Last one I saw was in a logging camp near Miri, Sarawak about 1983. :)) Good unit with excellent characteristics. If you know the rpm of the 3-ph motor, I suppose you'll need to drive the unit at the same speed with your external power, and have some kind of speed governor.
Reply to
Potblak
Hi Potblak,
Thank you for providing the name of the critter. After doing some additional internet research it appears they're still being made in Australia.
Thanks! Vernon
Potblak wrote:
Reply to
Vernon
I bought one years ago for $25.00 with some very long cables. My plan was to drive it with a 12 HP briggs vertical shaft engine. A few problems, it would be a bit of work to get a lovejoy ontop of the unit but could be done, however with mine the rotation was in the wrong direction so the engine idea was out. To try to drive it from the bottom would be very hard.
Reply to
wayne mak
Wayne,
What is a "lovejoy"? A pulley??
And why do you say? "To try to drive it from the bottom would be very hard."
Since you've already looked into it and I haven't, I don't doubt you. But I'm just wondering what the issues are.
Is it because of the wrong direction of rotation?
If I ever attempted it I'd figure on driving it from a tractor PTO or stationary engine.
Thanks! Vernon
Reply to
Vernon
A 'lovejoy' is a brand name for a standard shaft coupler with a rubber insert to accomodate minor alignment issues.
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Vern> Wayne,
Reply to
RoyJ
Thanks, and especially for the picture!
Therefore, I take it you were planning to attach a lovejoy to the TOP of the unit and drive it? Was that due to direction of spin problems?
V
Reply to
Vernon
Not my project!!! But I think Wayne was just planning to mount the vertical shaft motor on top, take off the cover plate, use a coupling to drive it at motor speed, done. Almost all vertical shaft engines will run CW from the recoil starter end, CCW from the drive end. Looking down on the top of the welder, it would need to run CW, apparently it runs CCW viewed from the top. Engines do not run in reverse. The generator MIGHT be reconfigured to run CW
Vern> Thanks, and especially for the picture!
Reply to
RoyJ
Thats correct I was going to mount the engine on top. The welder was a 3400 RPM so it was perfect for the 3600 RPM engine. I removed the top cover and cooling fan and could have reworked things a bit to get enough grab for a lovejoy BUT the rotation was wrong. If I flipped the whole thing over there was no good way to mount the engine/lovejoy. I took the cables, a few good old variable resistors and dumped the rest.
I have made a few alternator driven welders that do work nice with stick welding
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follow the links I still have a design in my head but it all takes time.
Reply to
wayne mak
Well, not to sound negativistic. But if you didn't want to bite it off it is more than clear to me that I might as well fuggitit!
Y'all are so far beyond me in ability, talent, and equipment, it ain't even funny!
So, what should I do with that bad boy? As heavy as it is, the copper salvage value alone must be more than five bucks!
V
Reply to
Vernon
Belt drive.
The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.
In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.
Theodore Dalrymple,
Reply to
Gunner
Hello Gunner, everyone
In general - generator welding machines like the diesel-driven "Pipeliners" or the motor-generator workshop machines...
Is it worth making an special effort to try one, if you want to understand all the possibilities of welding?
Does the weld "handle" differently if you are say using a Lincoln Bullet (motor generator)?
I don't have one readily available to me, but is there a reason to make an extra effort to try one?
Richard Smith
Reply to
Richard Smith
If you ever get a chance to try out the production class pipeline welders, go for it. Smoothest arc you'll ever get to.
Richard Smith wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ

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