Removing Old Monokote

I'm stripping an old model and having a tough time getting the covering off
cleanly. In places I've been able to peel it off and the balsa is clean. On
some of it, the clear top skin is coming off and the color coat is stuck to the
balsa. Other parts seem to be baked on hard. Any ideas to make this job easier?
Reply to
Wrbirkett
Loading thread data ...
I found that once the clear coat comes off, the colored part sands off real easy. I don't know of a better method. Heating only seems to make it worse.
Reply to
Normen Strobel
Sanding works well, as does acetone or Monokore Trim Solvent. Caution, either of these may soften CA-glued joints. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
Reply to
Dr1Driver
Apply a LOT of heat,. Hold then nose of the gun right on the covering, shrinking it into a little shriveled up wad of plastic. If you don't apply enough heat, you will be able to remove the clear coat, leaving the adhesive and color on the wood. As stated, Acetone and sandpaper. Good Luck Bill
Reply to
me
Next time use Ultracote and the adhesive comes off a lot better. It also doesn't have the color in the adhesive!
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Monokote also does not have the color in the adhesive.
Reply to
me
Yes, it does, Bill... In fact, the adhesive layer provides the color for MK... It's very easy to leave all the adhesive behind and pull off nothing but clear mylar film...
Bill
Reply to
Bill Fulmer
Isn't that why the original poster is having problems? Every bit of Monokote I have ever applied had the color in the glue. When did it change?
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
I have primarily used Monokote as a replacement for other brands of film. The planes that I have been forced into recovering were not covered with Monokote, which I prefer for it's toughness and gloss. I have never removed Monokote and had the color and adhesive stay on the plane.
Reply to
me
Paul I guess it's what ever a guy gets along with. One local guy uses a technique that I haven't and frankly do not have the patience to try. He learned this from his son who lives in New Mexico. He applies Monokote with an iron set at around 200 degrees. Takes him hours to apply and shrink the film, but he says his planes can sit in the hot NM sun all day and the film does not wrinkle???? He has a giant Laser his son gave him and the covering is flawless. There probably is more to the technique, but I have never really asked him about it.
Reply to
me

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.