V tails

Hi Folks, so just how does a V tail work and how are they controlled? I know you need a mixer but does this mean two servos
working like twin rudders or are they opposed? cant quite envisage how they work and are controlled, may need to use one on a 5 foot span model of a Red Kite (bird of prey) which has taken my interest,
regards, Terry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terence Lynock (MSW) wrote:

In the olden days a sliding tray was used to control a V tail. One servo was mounted in the sliding tray and connected to the tail via pushrods in the same way you generally mount an aileron servo. This was the rudder servo. The other servo was connected to the tray to move it fore and aft for elevator control.
Most of the high end radios have V tail mixing where you just plug two servos into two channels, and you tell the radio that it's a V tail and it does its thing automatically.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What he said, there's also an after market device you can buy for a non-computer radio to make it do V-tail. Anyone remember who made this? mk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In quatrain 5-97, Nostradamus predicted that on Tue, 24 Apr 2007 14:41:04
MJKolodziej would say:

Dubro: http://www.shopatron.com/product/product_id=DUB215/101.0
HTH, Vicki
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| What he said, there's also an after market device you can buy for a | non-computer radio to make it do V-tail. Anyone remember who made this?
There's lots of them out there.
Here's a few --
http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXHHS3 http://www.lynxmotion.com/Product.aspx?productIDF4&CategoryIDD http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXELT4 http://www.fmadirect.com/detail.htm?item 96&sectionR
and there's many more.
And if you wanted to do it in your TX, you could do something like this --
http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/gadgets/mixer.htm
though if you wanted elevon mixing on a mode 2 TX (where both channels are on the same stick) you could just rotate the stick 45 degrees. (Of course, then it wouldn't feel right -- I'd suggest just doing it electronically.)
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzied.us
"Things should be made as simple as possible, but not any simpler."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| > Terence Lynock (MSW) wrote: | >> Hi Folks, | >> so just how does a V tail work and how are they | >> controlled? I know you need a mixer but does this mean two servos | >> working like twin rudders or are they opposed? cant quite envisage how | >> they work and are controlled, may need to use one on a 5 foot span model | >> of a Red Kite (bird of prey) which has taken my interest, | >> | >> regards, Terry | > | > | > In the olden days a sliding tray was used to control a V tail. One servo | > was mounted in the sliding tray and connected to the tail via pushrods in | > the same way you generally mount an aileron servo. This was the rudder | > servo. The other servo was connected to the tray to move it fore and aft | > for elevator control. | > | > Most of the high end radios have V tail mixing where you just plug two | > servos into two channels, and you tell the radio that it's a V tail and it | > does its thing automatically. | | What he said, there's also an after market device you can buy for a | non-computer radio to make it do V-tail. Anyone remember who made this? | mk | | |
There have been several electronic mixers advertised in the R/C magazines over the years. A Yahoo search turned up this one: http://www.veetail.com/ And this one: http://www.robotcombat.com/marketplace_rc-acces.html
--
Jarhead



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 24, 5:01 am, Terence Lynock (MSW)

With the two angles surfaces, up elevator is both up, down is both down. The net forces are vertical. Left yaw is left surface down and right surface up, and the net force is tail right. Right yaw has left surface up and the right one down, so that the net force is tail left. If we apply up elevator and right rudder, the right surface won't move and the left one will rise, forcing the tail down and to the left, producing a climbing righ turn, which is what we asked for. These airplanes are a little less stable in yaw than their three-surface cousins, but it might be noticeable only in turbulence. I've flown a Bonanza and noticed no unusual yaw, though some who fly long distances say it'll "hunt" a bit. In full-scale airplanes like the Bonanza or Davis DA-2 there's a mechanical mixer that takes the rudder pedal and control column inputs and mixes them to produce two outputs for the tail. Once you see these things they're easy to understand. In models the two servos are fed appropriate signals from the receiver, which is a lot simpler and lighter than a mechanical mixer.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, make sure you get it right, I had my rudder control set to the aileron stick on the TX (It just seemed easier) On it's maiden flight I checked the controls viewing them as ailerons. I even got someone else to confirm OK. They were, of course, reversed....BANG!!
Trefor

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I should have mentioned, this was a 3 channel (no ailerons) electric glider
Trefor

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.