Career in Architecture

Hello and a Happy New Year,
I have a degree in Architecture which I obtained from my native country in South Asia about 10 years back. I currently live in the United States (in
the Northeast). Unfortunately, I have not practiced Architecture or held a job in any related field in the last 6 years.
I have missed working in this field, and need some pointers on how to prepare to re-enter this field, specifically: -What knowledge / certification do employers expect an entry-level candidate to know and have, -how difficult / easy is it to get a job, -and what are the salary prospects ?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I recently heard about the forum listed below:

Try posting your question to that list. Good luck whoever you are.
Garth.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
candidate

Some CAD knowledge is probably a must for a beginner. Beyond that the expectations are (at least) comensurate with the salary being paid.

Market conditions vary with time and location. Watch your local paper for stories/ads about new construction. See lots? Take a look at your skyline. See many cranes? They're a good indicators. My local professional association publishes a "jobs bulletin" every couple of weeks and distributes it free of charge. When times are bad it's two pages. When times are good it's twenty-eight.

Compared to what? On the whole, with the training taken into account, salaries are poor I'm afraid. Starting salaries are ridiculous. That's part of this business. Almost EVERYBODY wants to be an architect, until a few years pass and they really need a new pair of pants. Then a clerical job with a regional insurance provider, or a commission sales job selling janitorial supplies starts to look just as sexy.
One more thing. The lack of North-American experience will limit you for many reasons. If you want to pursue this I suggest that you cut you expenses as much as you can, offer yourself for as little as you can tolerate, and amass as much experience as you can as quickly as is possible. Learn about everything going on around you, and never think that there is something beneath you. If you are no longer learning at your job, and they won't give you something new to do, find a new job and quit. Hang out with other ambitious architect-types. Learn everything they know, and finally, do your best at everything. Don't take short cuts, ethical or otherwise. It doesn't matter if anyone notices, even though they probably will. You will be learning faster by doing so.
Think of it as a life-long war of professional attrition: the last one standing (and designing) wins.
--

MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
First, Learn AutoCAD. There are better CAD systems, like Revit and Architectural Desktop (which is AutoCAD based), but most are using plain old AutoCAD. You MUST learn it. When you become comfortable with AutoCAD, apply at temp agencies as a Architectural CAD drafter. Keep doing that until you find a nich that you like and that likes you and get on permanent payroll. And never let a Sunday paper go buy without buying it. Good luck. :-) -- Bill DeShawn snipped-for-privacy@nospamsterling.net http://my.sterling.net~bdeshawn

candidate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.