Is formal drafting training necessary 4 career

Is it realistic to think that I could get a drafting job after
completing a certificate program in Autocad but without any formal
Drafting training such as at a associates degree from a tech school or
community college? (I have a BA in physics) If not, would passing the
ADDA drafting test (by self study) get me a job, or would I still need
formal training. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Reply to
edhelms
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it's all in who you know,,, if it is no one, you will not get a job with out a lot of luck
Reply to
Longshot
I'm 19 turning 20 in less than 3 months. I've had basic CAD training in highschool but that was about it... I've spent the last year working at a civil engineering firm as a drafter, and previously I worked at an architecture firm as a drafter.
I'm not sure about where you live, but here there's quite a few positions out for drafters and such, and as long as you demonstrate the skill and ability you're pretty much guaranteed a job.
HTH
lilmissgiggles
Reply to
lilmissgiggles
Where are you located, giggles? I've been looking for work the last 4 months and have yet to get a call. I'm in Pittsburgh and not having a bit of luck. I am willing to relocate.
Reply to
YeaRuss
Toronto, Ontario
Reply to
lilmissgiggles
right now is a pretty shitty time to look though (or at least in the civil engineering field), our office is pretty quiet these days, hopefully as the weather gets better things will pickup....
Reply to
lilmissgiggles
It seems bad all over right now. And according my contacts things aren't looking promising. No matter how much experience you have it's tough.
Reply to
YeaRuss
Hey neighbor, me too.
The American economy has been trailing behind ours for some time now, so things aren't quite as bright there as here. Here, for the right money, almost anybody could get a job drafting. Experienced or not.
BTW is that a typo in your return email, or a "double-entendre"?
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich
It depends on you local market conditions. There are places where you could get a job with those qualifications.
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich
lol.... it stops the spam.....
Reply to
lilmissgiggles
It really depends upon what field you're in. The bulk of my work is residential and things have been going great for a number of years and the next 5+ years also are expected to be very strong.
Even when things are bad there's still work, you just have to be able to differentiate yourself so that when the work load is low you're the one who gets it.
Michael (LS)
Reply to
Michael (LS)
YES
But just driving Autocad is not enough. you could compare it to being able to use a drawing board and drafting machine. There are conventions in all drafting disciplines that have to be understood and followed. You also will need to gain knowledge as to how things go together in the most economical and best practice way. You will never stop learning as a draftsman. Some of the best draftsmen come from the other end of the process - the factory floor after an apprenticeship as a tradesman.
But don't let me discourage you. Go for it but always be prepared to learn from others.
Reply to
Andrew NIELSEN
I couldn't agree with you more Andrew. If you go into this profession that's the most important point ("You will never stop learning as a draftsman.")
able to use a drawing board and drafting machine. There are
followed. You also will need to gain knowledge as to how
never stop learning as a draftsman. Some of the best
an apprenticeship as a tradesman.
Reply to
YeaRuss
able to use a drawing board and drafting machine. There are
Quite correct and something that is often not stressed enough in schools. They like to give the impression that learning to use the software is all you need.
You also will need to gain knowledge as to how
never stop learning as a draftsman. Some of the best
an apprenticeship as a tradesman.
I spent 15 years on the shop floor. In that time, I worked from many prints drawn by people that obviously didn't have any idea about what they were drawing. Don't be one of those.
Yes. Basic skills and willingness to learn is all you need.
Reply to
CW
Edhelms,
I can't say about the job you are going after, but I know an auto industry that will heir you. They have hired so may in the past.
W. Kirk Crawford Rochester Hills, Michigan
edhelms wrote:
Reply to
W. Kirk Crawford
same way architects don't understand how cabinetry is made.
;)
Reply to
birtch
Some don't. You can't be an expert at everything. The smart man realizes this and also realizes that a lot of time and expense can be saved by consulting an expert in the particular field he is dealing with.
Reply to
CW
Thanks, CW. I was going to say that. A architectural school chum of mine makes his living making pretty nice cabinetry, and has nine fingers to prove it...
His site's at
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I don't have his skill, but I have a made a few simple cabinets. That makes me a little unusual among my peers, I'll admit, but I'm tired of these kinds of broad swipes at my profession.....What percentage of draftsmen know how cabinetry is made?
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich
you missed the ;)
I couldn't be happier that architects don't specialise in cabinetry, otherwise I would have to pay for my schooling working at Mc Donald's instead of sitting behind my computer in my underwear.
Mathew
Reply to
birtch
No, I didn't miss it. I did miss the word "some" in front of "architects" though.
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich

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