Dead Career - Drafting

If you are thinking about going to school for a Drafting Degree then RUN!
Drafters draw blueprints and engineers design them. The current
problem is that somehow Drafting and Designing have become synonymous terms. It used to be that a Drafter would draw blueprints from an engineer's/architect's verbal instructions and/or the engineer's/architect's sketches. Now the Drafter is supposed to know what took an engineer/architect 4+ years to learn. If the Drafter cannot "pick it up" what took the engineers/architects 4+ years to learn then they throw you out the back door on your face in the gravel.
Also, Engineers or Architects are refusing to take time to train Drafters. They say that they don't have time or go grab a book off of the shelf and figure it out.
A two-year Associate Degree in Drafting WILL NOT prepare you to be an engineer and do an engineer's job!
I have not designed (like an engineer) commercial buildings or other engineering projects, but I did draw them by verbal instruction, engineering sketches and blueprints.
My Computer Aided Drafting degree, basically, prepared me to draw blueprints using AutoCAD software. Unfortunately, the local Drafting courses in Kentucky, the Two-Year Drafting programs, do not prepare you to do engineering design work (what engineers due with a 4+ year degree).
Typically, all students come out ready to draw blueprints, as Drafters have always done in the past, but not design without a Bachelors degree like an engineer is trained to do.
Today, for the modern Drafter, it is turning into the old catch 22 you-need-experience situation. No one has time or is willing to train yet they demand experience. Furthermore, if you can't "pick up" what took engineers four years to learn in a year or; in most cases, thirty days or less then they will lay you off and insult you by saying you couldn't catch on fast enough. So what is the Drafter left to do?
A downside for the engineer in today's modern engineering office is that they are expected to spend all of their time drafting while they could, more productively, spend their time dealing with public relations and engineering design. Also, most architects and engineers that I have spoken with have a weak background in CAD and take only a couple of classes in Drafting during their college education.
Lastly, as stated in my objective, I am looking for a company who is flexible and willing to train for non-Drafting engineer Design tasks. The former title for my past experience would be a "CAD Detailer/Drafter". I have drawn blueprints, as I was prepared to do by my two-year Associate Degree, but I have not "designed" as one who is "trained" by an architectural or engineering firm.
Currently, I have been out of a Drafting position for over 2 years because engineering firms have become too "picky" and want something for nothing. I guess it time for me to move on and realize that Drafting is a dead field.
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i know several guys that are prospering in a drafting field that dont even have that 2 year degree. education is not a substitute for common sense or taking pride in your work.
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Maybe it varies from country to country. CAD Drafties here in Oz seem to be in short supply like many other construction trades.
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Same here in Canada. I don't know the OP at all, and I don't know what he hopes to gain by his post. I don't know anything about him, but if the days of "dumb drafting" are over you won't see me shed a tear.
I once worked in an office of mostly community college cad jockeys, and their attitude towards their work was deplorable. The only thing they cared about were their paychecks, beer, pot, sex, and their cars. One guy handed me a supposedly finished set of plans for a house and there was an entire of corner of the house which had no means of structural support. When I asked him how he could take a set of drawings as far as he did without a clue about how it stood up, he said he couldn't figure that part out, so he just moved on.
Elsewhere, I have had the honor of working with "mere" draftsman who elevated their work to the level of a fine craft, and they taught me a lot that I still carry around today. These guys don't have to look for work. Work comes looking for them.
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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I hope these "cad jockeys" aren't expected to design structural support. That's the job of the structural engineer.

We generate models in 3D. With 3D "walkthrough" software, we can visualize the model. We can even give a "published" version of the model (not the DWG) to the client with the 3D viewer and they can visualize what their plant will look like. The response was tremendous when we first started doing this.
What I'm getting at, is men and women looking to enter the drafting trades should consider honing their 3D skills. We have a hard time finding people who 3D well! -S
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There's a lot of ground between structural calculations and common sense. My point is that some fools think that because some fancy-pants, university trained guy is taking ultimate responsibility for the project, they don't have to apply common sense to their work.
I wouldn't draw anything I didn't understand, because I wouldn't have any way of knowing if I had even drawn it correctly, and I would need continual supervision. That's completely unproductive. If I had to supervise every "from point" and "to point" I might as well draw it myself. (I ended up redrawing this guys work, rather than explain it to him.)
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I can draw 2d or 3d, but in the 15 years that I've worked with Cad I've never had to draw anything in 3D. (HVAC/Plumbing/electrical building systems)
I also hope we don't switch to 3D in the building services field, Its bad enough having to change 100,000 square foot hvac or electrical designs in 2D every time an architect changes a walls location by 3 inches.
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Though I since a few insults toward my drafting opinions, I'll admit that 3D work would be nice if done correctly. But the Architects that provide the drawings that we work with and hire us must first produce the 3D floor plans which has not happened yet.
I am comfortable drafting in 3D or 2D having once worked for a few years for an injection molding plant. I still think that 3D requires more keystrokes to edit over a 2D drawing in production drafting (where the client requires our designs and drawings in the quickest time)
If a person can't look at building sections to determine a pipe, duct, conduit routing they should not be in the design drafting business.
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. I still think that 3D requires

a 3d model can be changed in one view & the other views are automatically completed. a 2d requires separate changes in multiple views & much more room for error.
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We only use one view in our work. I usually create a base sheet that references whatever architectural drawings we have, locate whatever electrical, hvac, plumbing items needed. then setup mviews breaking up the larger base sheet into whatever I need at whatever plot scale is needed. I only edit the one view.

I've never had to do any dimensioning on our projects. I did when I worked for a injection molding co. but associated dimensions where very easy to update

I agree with the LOL
I just started building a little CNC wood router to do some wood carvings and look forward to seeing some 3D acad creations come to life in my work shop.
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Not to long ago, you were arguing against 3D. Finally made the change, huh?

room
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you have me mistaken for someone else i have been 3d for over 10 years

automatically
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I remember now. Sheet metal duct work. Your resistance was to upgrading to more productive and capable software.

more
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right.. we bought a single floating solid works license this past week. i haven't had a chance to test drive it yet. we had an inventor demo & i wasnt impressed with it. I think the acad will always be the primary software for plant layouts nut the solid works will be great for smaller tricky projects.. we are building some funky oil tanks for custom choppers that require minimal welds & there are many variations of the same tank.. this is exactly where the software will be huge. :)
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Cliff wrote:

True very true. No one will train and you have to be like the Bewitched show and wiggle your nose to get instant Bachelors degree knowledge with only a two-year CAD Drafting degree.
I guess the engineers want to do it all him or herself or something. :-P
You dont throw a baby in a swimming pool and tell it to swim!
When will the logic ever sink in???
Stop blaming the Drafter for lack of willingness to train! Duhh!
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Cliff wrote:

Your smart remarks have proved my points. DRAFTING IS A DEAD FIELD!
Sadly, the only side that will ever be heard will be the Engineer/Architect's side.
Before you make any more remarks about "dumb Drafting"; remember, you are only as good as your trainer.
You are implying that all Drafters who cant meet your expectations -- WITH NO TRAINING IN ENGINNERING DESIGN (Not provided by schools or Engineering/Architect firms) -- are stupid.
You are STUPID by expecting someone to know something without showing or explaining it to them.
You are STUPID for expecting someone to pull monkeys out of his arse.
The schools do not prepare you and the Architects/Engineers DO NOT CARE.
Do you want to be a Drafter after hearing comments from these jerks?
Go for it and sign up for the abuse! You will be right back at Taco Bell after you graduate from your Drafting course -- I promise.
Fuck Drafting.
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Opps, I was wrong. :-(
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Cliff,
Refer to your first statement: <<Once you think it's about "drawing" you have already lost.>>
which contradicts your last statement:
<<You might be using 2D AutoCAD and be

Drafting a BOM in 3D is still drawing parts. So which one is it?
wrote:

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We are beyond many companies in our business. Many of our clients have never seen this capability offered. Sure, mainframe systems have been avaialble for years and even PC based 3D has been available since the late 80's, but smaller engineering firms could not afford mainframes so they used PCs. PCs could not handle large models until the late 90's when large memory became affordable and CPUs got faster.

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What program are you using for 3d generation?
Dan

he
guy
an
part
lot
DWG)
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