Dead Career - Drafting

I'll wager that he's a "keyboard" guy as opposed to a "button" guy.
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich
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Personally its not how fast but how accurate. No point on doing it in 3 minutes if the answer is wrong, take 5 and be right.
Reply to
uNkulunkulu
zion9
Times change. Every CEO has a PC on his (her) desk now, and most do at least some of their correspondence from it. Typing pools are mostly gone, and even large companies share one secretary position amongst whole departments, with engineers and managers making up the difference by doing some of their own secretarial work.
I completely agree with you that many CAD positions are underpaid. I see many AutoCad positions advertised at about 1.5X minimum wage - when the skill and understanding required to do the job well should be worth much more than that. That's just the way it is - few companies today have a lot to invest in someone who just does AutoCad.
What would you think of a secretary who says "I'm not into all of this "personal assistant" nonsense, and I don't care about Word, Powerpoint and Excel. I just type - that's it." You'd probably say she isn't selling her skills very well, and doesn't seem interested in investing what's necessary to get a better job.
Take the hint - zion9. There are good jobs out there, and many employers take it as a godsend if one of the applicants has AutoCad skills - but no one today wants someone who says "You show me where all the lines go, and I'll just click the mouse button."
If you feel you have AutoCad proficiency, but lack the necessary skills to present yourself in a more demanding position, then you'll have to start as a drafter, possibly in an underpaid position. If you invest in learning the company's business, however, then you can move up. Learn enough, and you'll soon be able to present yourself to other companies as a designer/drafter - many many working "engineers" do not have engineering degrees, but learned on the job.
Any company in a hiring position is interested in someone ambitious, curious and eager to learn. If they can get a Cad person at a low wage, they'll take it - the rest is up to you.
G Faris
Reply to
Greg Farris
One would have to try very seriously to be further off the mark!
Reply to
Greg Farris
there are a buttons?
Reply to
longshot
those 2.5 minutes included pulling dimensions to check my work. ... someone did point out that configuration is a huge factor,, & that is true. if i didnt have all my aliases configured & my settings in place .it would probably double my time,
Reply to
longshot
;:: )
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich
To "button" or not to "button"? Answer 1. Yes, why not? Answer 2. No, why bother? Answer 3. Only new people that don't know what they are doing use "buttons". Answer 4. Only oldtimers stuck in the past still rely on the keyboard. Answer 5. Buttons slow you down. Answer 6. The keyboard slows you down. Answer 7. On & on. Another topic, another day. This thread is too long now.
Reply to
S. Scalise
I don't button, but if it makes you faster go for it
I prefer the keyboard with my own aliases and or lisp commands
Reply to
Modat22
people aways told me.. Man you are so fast.. if you would only leanr how to use those buttons, you be twice as fast...
Reply to
Longshot
Where I work (petro-chemical), we get fresh engineers from university each year. They get a quick course on AutoCad, and get thrown in at the deep end. Sink or swim....
The engineers aren't expected to do all the detail work, just the overall design, so there will always be a job for drafties. It is NOT the drafties job to design....sure, once youv'e been at the job for a while you learn the basics and could get away with designing, but as everything needs to be signed off, it's not worth it.
It makes life easier for me as the engineers notes/sketches etc. are in the computer and easy to access.
Drafting is a long way from being dead....As long as engineers are paid more than drafties, there will always be details that need sorting out. The same goes for architects and drafties...the is a huge gap between 'concept' drawings and 'construction' drawings.
Move down to NZ where there is a shortage of drafties, and you will find that employers are still 'picky'. It's not a glamorous job, but it's still important. You can have the cleverest engineer/design team in the world, but if the draftie stuffs it up, it gets built wrong! ("It was the checkers fault.....")
Brian NZ
Reply to
Brian
How easy is it to get into New Zealand?
Reply to
uNkulunkulu
If you can speak (passable) English and have ANY skills, there shouldn't be any problems. The more skilled people we can get down here, the better.
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Check these guys out, they cover most questions.
Brian NZ
Reply to
Brian

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