Dead Career - Drafting

Cliff
The modern brick size in the UK is 65mmx215mmx102.5mm (OK they are made of clay and the size varies a little from brick to brick. And you
will see the width taken as 100, 102, 103 or evem 105 by Architects.
However it is accepted that the thickniess or mortar is 10mm thus the building module becomes 225 x 75mm. The BDA Brick Development Association produces tables that give the amount of bricks used in various typical situations. i.e.
A straight wall A wall with returns either end A wall with a return one end Over openinigs etc etc
It's the basic setting out of drawings / plans such that the amount of brick cutting can be kept to a minimum and the very basic information about the materials they are drawing and how they are placed, whatever type or grade of mortar is being used.
Alan

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
U.K. sounds like a simple gig to me. Here we have half dozen brick modules to work with.
Modular Metric C.S.R. Norman etc..
Then there are imperial size windows openings while using modular metric bricks.Try figuring that one out!
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't forget Jumbo, Ontario, Norman Engineer, etc. A nightmare.
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The window people for standard size windows work to the old imperial size bricks which were a different module. But if you are going to make windows for the scheme why not use the modular size?
Blocks are based on a similar module to bricks i.e. 3 bricks high so 215mm + 10mm mortar and 440 ling with 10mm perp. Thus the cavity wall ties can match up with courses in the inner and outer leaf.
I had toinvestigate a building (read sports complex) where the walls seemed to move when a UK footbal was kicked againit it. On opening up we found the the builder had not lined up the briick and block coursinig so had bent all the wall ties into the cavity out og the way so he could build his outer leaf.
Bring back the COW
On Thu, 3 Nov 2005 15:15:50 -0500, "Michael Bulatovich"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cadalot wrote:

Finally, someone who isn't being a jerk and a realist.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FUCK DRAFTING!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Get a McJob.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This person zion9 sounds like a BIG CRY BABY TO ME and wants to start some hate and discontent. ALAN

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
zion9
Times change. Every CEO has a PC on his (her) desk now, and most do at least some of their correspondence from it. Typing pools are mostly gone, and even large companies share one secretary position amongst whole departments, with engineers and managers making up the difference by doing some of their own secretarial work.
I completely agree with you that many CAD positions are underpaid. I see many AutoCad positions advertised at about 1.5X minimum wage - when the skill and understanding required to do the job well should be worth much more than that. That's just the way it is - few companies today have a lot to invest in someone who just does AutoCad.
What would you think of a secretary who says "I'm not into all of this "personal assistant" nonsense, and I don't care about Word, Powerpoint and Excel. I just type - that's it." You'd probably say she isn't selling her skills very well, and doesn't seem interested in investing what's necessary to get a better job.
Take the hint - zion9. There are good jobs out there, and many employers take it as a godsend if one of the applicants has AutoCad skills - but no one today wants someone who says "You show me where all the lines go, and I'll just click the mouse button."
If you feel you have AutoCad proficiency, but lack the necessary skills to present yourself in a more demanding position, then you'll have to start as a drafter, possibly in an underpaid position. If you invest in learning the company's business, however, then you can move up. Learn enough, and you'll soon be able to present yourself to other companies as a designer/drafter - many many working "engineers" do not have engineering degrees, but learned on the job.
Any company in a hiring position is interested in someone ambitious, curious and eager to learn. If they can get a Cad person at a low wage, they'll take it - the rest is up to you.
G Faris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

One would have to try very seriously to be further off the mark!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

lol
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
zion9 wrote:

Where I work (petro-chemical), we get fresh engineers from university each year. They get a quick course on AutoCad, and get thrown in at the deep end. Sink or swim....
The engineers aren't expected to do all the detail work, just the overall design, so there will always be a job for drafties. It is NOT the drafties job to design....sure, once youv'e been at the job for a while you learn the basics and could get away with designing, but as everything needs to be signed off, it's not worth it.
It makes life easier for me as the engineers notes/sketches etc. are in the computer and easy to access.
Drafting is a long way from being dead....As long as engineers are paid more than drafties, there will always be details that need sorting out. The same goes for architects and drafties...the is a huge gap between 'concept' drawings and 'construction' drawings.
Move down to NZ where there is a shortage of drafties, and you will find that employers are still 'picky'. It's not a glamorous job, but it's still important. You can have the cleverest engineer/design team in the world, but if the draftie stuffs it up, it gets built wrong! ("It was the checkers fault.....")
Brian NZ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How easy is it to get into New Zealand?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
uNkulunkulu wrote:

If you can speak (passable) English and have ANY skills, there shouldn't be any problems. The more skilled people we can get down here, the better.
http://www.emigratenz.org /
Check these guys out, they cover most questions.
Brian NZ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.