beeswax

what is beeswax used for i assume a coating, get the metal hot n rub it on
is that right?
Reply to
me
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I wouldn't use beeswax myself. I do use it, in some quantity, but not on metalwork. I generally use a commercial harder finishing wax, such as Liberon's Black Bison. Wax is usually applied mixed in a solvent, to make it easier to apply - I've posted recipes to rec.woodworking and rec.knives before (search for "carnauba").
Waxes should be used cold, then buffed well. A stiff shoe polishing brush is about right.
The usual hot finish is oil instead. Clean engine oil can give blues, old engine oil gives a better black. Vegetable oils generally end up brown. Experiment, and expect fires.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Hehe, reminds me of the army days buffing the barracks floors. We'd fire up a can of Johnsons paste wax and then dump it all over the place and buff it out. Funny, never saw a smoke detector around there...
GA
Reply to
Greyangel
Interesting chemistry in doing that. Same as adding amonia to waxes to make them easier to work.
How did you polish your boots ? Spit and polish, or the spoon and candle flame ? "burning your boots" used to be both a disciplinary offence (it ruins their waterproofing, and a necessary requirement for getting the right parade ground shine. Now I guess a charred spoon in the barracks would be seen quite differently.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Putting wax on warm really helps; it flows into all the cracks nicely.
You can also do a burnt wax finish, but it is pretty finicky about having the right temperature. With the right temp you can get an interesting brown finish that is pretty durable.
Steve
Andy D>>
Reply to
Steve Smith
I think it was all spit polish (can of water close by). Been a while - I have vague memories of burning the polish in the can too but this could just be cross wired memory circuits.
GA
Reply to
Greyangel
I use it a lot in demonstrating to the public. I apply it hot, at about 350 degrees F. I simply test by rubbing it on the part. If it catches fire, it is too hot. Always do this with gloves. I wipe off the extra beeswax while the part is still hot. Done in this manner, the metal turns black. It is a good interior finish, but not for outside. You want to apply it to parts that DO have fire scale on them. the beewax seems to actually soak in to the fire scale. Also smells nice in the process and gets a lot of audience reaction, especially if, while asking them what they think this is, I take a bit out of it. I wouldn't use this for exterior finish, but I did try it on some S hooks used outside and it lasted a couple of seasons.
Pete Stanaitis
me wrote:
Reply to
Pete & sheri
I went looking for some bees wax around my neck of the city gave up. I actually had to explain it to one girl in the crafts store. "you know, wax that comes from bees?" She was still confused when I left. Found some in another craft store. They wanted six bucks for four lousy ounces of the stuff. said the hell with it.
GA
Reply to
Greyangel
Is there a cloth store ? - they sell bee wax in snuff box size normally in a plastic holder with slots on one side. This is used to wax string and cord.
Maybe in the craft store, but in a different department.
Mart> I went looking for some bees wax around my neck of the city gave up. I
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Easiest place to find beeswax is a fabric store. They sell it in the 'notions' department. Not cheap, but convenient for small quantities. Six dollars for four ounces is excessive around here.
--RC
Projects expand to fill the clamps available -- plus 20 percent
Reply to
rcook5
There are lots of hits if you google for it, way cheaper.
Steve
Greyangel wrote:
Reply to
Steve Smith
The cloth store was where I found the little four oz. packages. Way cheaper on line. Yeah I expect so. Gotta wonder what this internet economy is doing to us when you can find what you want cheaper on line and people stop shopping in their local area. You end up with strip malls full of clothing stores and fast food joints on every corner and it's gotten hard to find anything of substance.
GA
Reply to
Greyangel
I remember seeing candles from bees wax at one time. If the problem persists let me know. We've got a lot bee keepers in my area and I'm sure I can get some easily (although it might be the REAL thing). How much would you like?
dennis in nca
Reply to
Dgrup
Wrong time of year. Best place to buy beeswax is from a beekeeper. It's almost a waste product to them these days, so they're quite cheap. I get mine from a guy selling honey at the local farmer's market.
Craft stores are _very_ expensive and some of their candle stuff is just honey-scented paraffin wax. Woodworking finishing suppliers carry it too - not expensive if you only need a few ounces.
Be grateful you're not doing gold leaf illumination on vellum - making "glair" uses earwax!
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Check out a hunting/outfitter that sells bow equipment. Many bow hunters wax their strings with bees wax. You can buy a tube for about $1.99
mark h
Reply to
Mark Henry
If it's in a tube, it's not just beeswax - they've turned it into a paste with something.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Unless the store of substance also has an on-line presence. That's becoming increasingly common.
Besides, look at it this way: If it weren't for the Internet our access to a whole lot of things (like blacksmith's tools!) would be spotty and restricted.
--RC
Projects expand to fill the clamps available -- plus 20 percent
Reply to
rcook5
And what's wrong with earwax I'd like to know?
Jewelers use nose oil all the time. There was even piece in 'Lapidary Journal" on its uses a while back.
-- And people say blacksmithing is a dirty craft!
--RC
Projects expand to fill the clamps available -- plus 20 percent
Reply to
rcook5
them these days, so they're quite cheap. I get mine from a
Here in the Former Colonies, dark beeswax sells for $30-$40 per pound from beekeepers in rural areas, more close to cities.
I mix beeswax and linseed oil 1:1, boil, let cool, then apply to forgings hot enough to smoke, but not hot enough to caramelize, wipe off the excess.
It makes one helluva inside finish; it won't last a month outside in areas of high humidity.
Reply to
Tom Stovall
Couldn't agree more. Love the internet for that reason. I get more confused looks around here when I'm looking to pick up something I need for knife project. Even the metal dealers stutter when you actually start to talk composition and tool steels. Though to be fair I finally found a metals dealer one town over that knows their stuff. It just aggravates me how narrow the scope is in my area. GA
Reply to
Greyangel

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