beeswax

GA,
I think he means "carnauba" wax. It's the primary ingredient in most car waxes. Go to somplace like O'Reilly's, Autozone or NAPA and check out the cans of
paste wax. Read the label and it should tell you whether or not it's carnauba.
Scotty
GA wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 04:37:08 -0800, "Greyangel"

Turtle wax (at least in the can) is (was) carnuba. It does work great for a show finish. One can I think will last me a lifetime. Talking about knife handles, I have a Gerber that I use to show how much better my blades are, but it has a fuzzy squeezable rubber type grip that I have to admit, may not be pretty but is great when field dressing an animal and your hands get all bloody.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

set
texture.
No doubt. Probably a good idea for cleaning fish (for which I'm a lot more likely to do). I'm a big fan of making the tool suit the purpose. Comfortable and easy to hang onto for "using knives" but I also plan to do a lot of decorative stuff too. Did a wood sheath for my boys knife out of black walnut and it definately would have benifited from a nice shine up.
GA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greyangel wrote:

A good handle wax is one that is a little harder than bee. Bee is often used to coat metal as a protection....
I use floor wax. It is tough. Car wax is good and often very liquid as well.
These are harder to wear off waxes and polish to a high sheen due to the hardeners. I did some file handles on my wood lathe and used floor wax. Found in good hardware stores in the flooring area.
Martin
--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 19:03:02 -0800, "Greyangel"
Wrong time of year. Best place to buy beeswax is from a beekeeper. It's almost a waste product to them these days, so they're quite cheap. I get mine from a guy selling honey at the local farmer's market.
Craft stores are _very_ expensive and some of their candle stuff is just honey-scented paraffin wax. Woodworking finishing suppliers carry it too - not expensive if you only need a few ounces.
Be grateful you're not doing gold leaf illumination on vellum - making "glair" uses earwax!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 13:16:58 +0000, Andy Dingley

And what's wrong with earwax I'd like to know?
Jewelers use nose oil all the time. There was even piece in 'Lapidary Journal" on its uses a while back.
-- And people say blacksmithing is a dirty craft!
--RC
Projects expand to fill the clamps available -- plus 20 percent
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote:

Here in the Former Colonies, dark beeswax sells for $30-$40 per pound from beekeepers in rural areas, more close to cities.
I mix beeswax and linseed oil 1:1, boil, let cool, then apply to forgings hot enough to smoke, but not hot enough to caramelize, wipe off the excess.
It makes one helluva inside finish; it won't last a month outside in areas of high humidity.
--
Tom Stovall, CJF
Farrier & Blacksmith
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Check out a hunting/outfitter that sells bow equipment. Many bow hunters wax their strings with bees wax. You can buy a tube for about $1.99
mark h
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If it's in a tube, it's not just beeswax - they've turned it into a paste with something.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So, All these things taken in their proper place ;) what's a prefered substance for putting a high gloss on wood handles? Or any other crafty wood work for that matter? I've got a hand carved maple wood katana that I did one day that I'd like to shine up nice to hang on the wall. I don't think I could scape out enough earwax to do the job ;)
GA

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 19:10:50 -0800, "Greyangel"

I prefer for handles more exotic woods like coco bolo, ironwood, even purpleheart. These woods buff up to a good shine without any kind of substance. Dont want to breath in the dust as you work them though. For crafty woodthings like intarsia and scrollsaw stuff (dont laugh now) I like good old gloss clear polyureathane varnish. If I want to add some color I do a satin varnish and stain, then a coat of clear gloss over it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

wood
did
think I

Sounds like everybody's got their own method of getting the desired result :) As is normal and right.
GA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 19:10:50 -0800, "Greyangel"
There isn't. It's a handle - you don't want it slippery.
For tool handles, my general finish is a commercial danish oil. These are oil / varnish mixes that are easy to apply, give a non-gloss, non-slippery finish and don't build enough of a coating that it will flake off if abused.

A wooden katana? Surely that's a bokken?
For general shininess, it's hard to go wrong with blonde shellac. For maple you might like a coat of oil beforehand (commercial tung-oil based "finishing oil" that is ready thinned and dried). This highlight the grain and chattoyance.
Plain wax is also good on maple, so long as you buff it out well. Use a _finishing_ wax, based on paraffin wax and carnauba, not a soft or polishing wax like beeswax, I've posted a load on wax recipes to rec.knives or rec.woodworking.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

OK, let me rephrase that - "decorative wood". Got lots of satisfactory suggestions at this point ;)

Not this one ;-) If I tried to hit anything with it, it would be a brokken. No - I carved it a bit closer to the actual dimensions of a true katana.

So if I was to use shellac, could I get that glassy wood grain look? Maybe with a base coat of Danish oil?

Tried straight paraphin on a clean cotton buffing wheel but was not impressed. Don't think it actually transferred to the wood.
GA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 20:07:12 -0800, "Greyangel"
Yes - shellac is the main material used in french polishing. For an "average" shine you'd be OK just painting the shellac on with a brush (1/2" filbert artist's synthetic bristle watercolour). For a super gloss, learn to french polish.
These are finished with coloured shellac, the stand with a plain shellac http://codesmiths.com/shed/things/knives/daisho /
(Yes, new photos are coming soon.)

No - Danish oil has varnish in it, to make it form a surface film. To bring the appearance of the timber out, just use a plain oil. You should use tung rather than linseed, to avoid yellowing with age.

Well it wouldn't do - you need to mix it with a solvent first, otherwise it's unworkably stiff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey. :/ Andy, I saw that movie "Personal Services" are you just messing with us dumb hicks in the colonies? :/
I'm not a "French Polishing" -wood- worker like Andy is;) but Brownell's claims epoxy makes the best of the "built-up type" finishes and most durable too (if traditional methods aren't required).
I prefer super glue for small handles like knives, it's easier. :)
But I'm weird my personal favorite is when the wood is soaked, dried, then all varnishing material "proud" of the wood is removed.
"wood, improved"?
To remove what's "standing on top of the wood" I mostly use 0000 steel wool and sometimes in certain spots 600 grit AlOx paper to help the process along.
Sitting outside, at the edge of the shade, so the direct sun can be used to easily find the "dull spots" where the super glue, BeechWood Casey or epoxy is still standing proud of the wood, is the breaker, IMO.
In the house it all looks good. ;) When you get the sun reflecting off it... the dull spots look like filth;) or something less than best anyway. ;)
My 700 BDL Remington stock is shiny and flashy but cheap looking at the same time, IMO.
My example...
http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/mesq-vs-iron.jpg
(local mesquite wood vs desert ironwood from Mexico)
Those have Kiwi neutral shoe polish on them.
Alvin in AZ ps- GA, your mequite is -almost- in the mail ;) pps- it might be nicer than that hunk too :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I didn't. Mighta passed that one over though depending on the rating...

mmm. Have to experiment with that one. What happens when you scratch it though? Can it be polished out?

Heard of the superglue thing before... somthing about it soaking into the wood better? Most superglue that I've seen comes in really small bottles though. Does it polish up glassy bright?

Discovered that sanding the Danish oil on wood will clog up paper in a big hurry. Same with the super glue? Never would dream of using Aluminum Oxide on wood though. Don't you get discoloration?

Cool! I got two handles I'm doing right now. The hatchet and the Utility knife. I just got through placing and shaping (yeah, did it in that order - never again) the bolsters on the Utility blade. Been getting by without a drill press up to know. Doing bolsters is not real forgiving of the kind of slop that comes with a hand drill though :/ I accidently oversized one hole trying to countersink it and got another a bit angled. Had some other weirdness occur. Fortunately the brass material is easily cold forged so with everything in place, I hammered the $&?#! out of it and then sanded and filed. Dumb ass bit of work but it's starting to look OK now. The pins don't blend in like they should but it's doable. Learned some valuable lessons... Got to get both blades finished by Christmas then I can get back to the swords ;-)
GA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 04:58:25 -0800, "Greyangel"

Yes.

Super glue may give you a super shine as a wood finish, but I wouldn't use as an adhesive in knife making. Super glue bonds get rather brittle with age and a hard knock can cause the bond to break.

Let's put it this way: Super glue is what's used to fill the minute voids in boulder opal before the stuff is polished. So yes, it will polish to a glass-like shine.
The preferred brand among lapidaries is "Hot Stuff". Comes in a number of different grades.
If you want a glass-like shine on a knife handle. Personally I'd just wax it after finishing and buff it out for a temporary shine. That way you can have the shine for display, but if someone wants to use the knife, they're not stuck with a slicker-than-owlshit handle.

Some, but not as bad. If I was going to use super glue on a piece of wood I'd take it through all but the last stage of finishing before I applied the super glue.

--RC Projects expand to fill the clamps available -- plus 20 percent
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 17:26:37 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@TAKEOUTmindspring.com wrote:

that it does,, I've also had the same thing happen when using 5 minute set-up epoxy,, but so far not with the 2 hour set-up epoxy,, even on fillet knives that have exotic hardwood slab handles just glued to a full tank handled blade. I do degrease the blade and the wood slabs with a short soak in laquer thinner and allow them all to air dry for a day before mounting the slabs. I do use superglue as a pore sealer on the slabs after they are ground to shap and finish sanded just before taking the knife to the buffer
The first rays of dawn make the mushrooms scream. I think with careful cultivation I can make them do "Ode to Joy".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

English made, funny accents;) and rated R for sure. (sort of?) True story so it's cool as anything that way. :)

I suppose it can, either be "level" with the woods surface or built up very thick or anything in between. Brownell's is really into all that specialized wood finishing stuff and is prob'ly -the- place to go for shiny wood finishes and information too.
Got a Brownell's catalog?
I'm not into "coated" wood. I don't want the finish to be higher than the original wood's surface. That limits what I know about any of this business. :/
Andy's way ahead of me there, even if he has a funny accent. ;)

The best stuff I've seen so far, Andy and others claim epoxy can be had that can soak-in better, problem is, I have no idea where to get any of that thin-pure-type epoxy. :/
For any sort of production (like selling knives) I'd look seriously into Andy's thin epoxy.

That hasn't presented a problem to -me- so far. Actually the other way around, regular thin-glue turns into gel if it sets around too long. BTDT with a couple brand new plastic-bottled "brush applicator inside" ones turned to gel before I got around to opening them the first time. :/ Metal tubes for me from now on. :/
Kinda disapointed, I thought I was fixin' to be shittin in tall cotton with that brush and the larger quanity too. ;)

I guess it can be, I'm not into that really. :/
Scot Slobodian (sp?) is where I first heard of SG's use on handles. GA you might consider trying out the "knife-list" email list if you have time for it. That's where i first heard about it, SS said he used SG for his handles.

Well it is plastic, so I can't say it doesn't, but it surprized me how cool super glue was too sand. I have some heavy-papered 600 grit reddish colored AlOx Norton sand paper I got from brownell's about 15 years ago.

Are you confusing AlOx paper-for-wood with SiC wet-or-dry paper?
Emery is a black form of AlOx and it's for metal and usually glued to cloth. I don't like it. Never did anything for me I couldn't do better with something else. Cloth backed clear AlOx (usually brown cloth) is another story tho, they seem to take more care in the sifting of the grain size there. Emery cloth is a half-assed excuse for grit sizes? Since it doesn't use numbers... fine, medium, coarse and extra coarse is all I've ever seen it in. :/
And for rough work the black emery grain seems too "friable?" too. Black emery is a natural product they dig up somewhere and glue it to cloth. ;)

Drilling is tricky sometimes. :/
For pocket knife blades I drill first then shape everything around the hole.

You mean counter sink the edges right? (not ream it out)
Do that by hand. I have counter sinks (even a dremel sized one) mounted in old key type drill chucks.

Since I was a young guy, I figured the main difference between skilled and un-skilled crafstman was the skilled craftsman can cover up his mistakes and make it look like it was supposed to be that way all along. :)
Ok so a guy learns not to make so many mistakes but that's never eleminated and the skilled guy saves it. (?)

Don't know how true this is anymore but read about a knife maker that lathe-like-cut his brass pins down from brass machine screws because it was the only stuff that was the same color as the available bolster material. It was in a knifemaking book.

I don't have a drill press and don't plan to get one. :/
What I use are 1000rpm (max) single speed hand drills and special extension cords I've made with a light dimmer in series. The speed is controlled with the light dimmer and it's set and stays put until I re-adjust it, as opposed to a couple pretty nice variable speed drills I have. They vary in speed even like the one with a screw to limit the trigger pull, the speed still varies some, sometimes.
I can't use a hand drill any better than anyone else... I won't give up my single speed drills with the light dimmer, they make drilling a nice hole, easy as pie. They make me look like I know what I'm doing. :)
A drill press could be better but then the skill switches to the setting up part of it, not the drilling. So hobby wise, it's less handmade?
Alvin in AZ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.